HTML Online Editor Sample

  Ballot Access News is edited and published by Richard Winger, the nation's leading expert on ballot access legal issues.

formats

Harrison Hickman Article on the Oddity that the Three Classes of U.S. Senate Seats Vary so Much

Published on October 25, 2014,

Harrison Hickman, a pollster and political analyst, has this interesting article about the three Classes of U.S. Senate seats. This year, the Class II seats are up. The article explains the statistical anomaly that the Class II seats are quite different from the Class I and the Class III seats. 2014 is a year in which the Class II seats are up.

Every southern state has a Class II seat, except for Florida. By contrast, only five southern states have a Class I seat.

The population of the states with Class II seats is considerably lower than the states with Class I and Class III seats. This is all just a result of a random process.

The U.S. Constitution went into effect in 1789, and said U.S. Senators would have six year terms. Congress then held a lottery to determine which of the U.S. Senate seats fell into each of the three classes. The purpose was to determine when each seat would be up for a new election. One-third of the Senators elected initially were assigned to Class I, and they had to run again in 1790. The Class II seats were up in 1792, and the Class III seats were up in 1794. The pattern has continued to this day. When new states were admitted to the Union, their two Senate seats were assigned to one of the particular classes, so as to keep the number of seats in each Class as equal as possible. Today, there are 33 Class I seats, 33 Class II seats, and 34 Class III seats.

Particular seats never change their Class. If a Senator is elected in 2010, and resigns in 2011, a special election is held for that seat in 2012. But since that is a Class III seat, it then has another (regular) election in 2016.

formats

Alameda County Green Party Asks California Voters to Cast Blank Ballots for Statewide Races

Published on October 25, 2014,

The Alameda County Green Party here suggests that California voters vote next month, but that they cast blank ballots for all the seven partisan statewide races. California is the only state this year in which voters cannot vote for any statewide partisan office unless they vote for a Democrat or a Republican.

The appeal is in Indybay.org (San Francisco Bay Area Independent Media Center), a well-read on-line news source.

formats

Hawaii Gubernatorial Poll

Published on October 24, 2014,

On October 23, a Honolulu Advertiser Poll was released for the Hawaii gubernatorial race. The results: Democrat David Ige 47%; Republican Duke Aiona 35%; Independent Party nominee Mufi Hannemann 12%; Libertarian Jeff Davis 1%. See here for more detail.

formats

Sixth Circuit Reverses U.S. District Court in Case on Individuals Jailed On or After Friday Before Election Day

Published on October 24, 2014,

On October 24, the Sixth Circuit reversed the U.S. District Court in Fair Elections Ohio v Husted, 14-4007. The issue was the ability to vote for persons jailed on or after the Friday before election day. Although such individuals would not have been convicted of any crime, in practice they cold not vote. The U.S. District Court had found this policy unconstitutional. The Sixth Circuit did not discuss that, but said the plaintiffs lack standing. Here is the decision. The vote is 2-1. Thanks to Rick Hasen for the link.

formats

Political Science Study Shows that Moderates Usually Have a Mix of Extreme Opinions of the Left and Right

Published on October 24, 2014,

On September 23, 2014, University of California political scientists published a 54-page study of “moderate” voters. Extensive survey research, covering 134 issues, reveals that “moderate” voters are typically people who have a mixture of “extreme left” and “extreme right” views. They end up looking like moderates because of the eclectic mixture of views from both sides of the spectrum.

Here is an article about the study. Thanks to Thomas Jones for the link.

formats

New York Libertarians Win Ballot Access Lawsuit for State Senate Candidate

Published on October 24, 2014,

On October 24, the New York State Supreme Court, Appellate Division, ruled that Gigi Bowman should be on the ballot as the Libertarian nominee for State Senate, 5th district, on Long Island. The case is Wilson v Bowman, 519828. Unqualified parties need 3,000 valid signatures to place a nominee on the ballot for State Senate in New York. The Libertarian petition had been challenged by Republican Party officials, and the lower court had removed Bowman from the ballot. The 4-page decision says that the challengers failed to serve Bowman in a timely fashion. Bowman also believes that she had enough valid signatures, but the court did not need to resolve that issue, since in any event the challenge to her petition is defective.

Bowman is the only Libertarian on the ballot for New York State Senate this year. The party also has two candidates for the Assembly.