December 1, 2002 Volume 18, Number 8

This issue was originally printed on blue paper.

Table of Contents

  1. MINOR PARTY AND INDEPENDENT VOTE FOR TOP OFFICES IS BEST MID-TERM RESULT SINCE 1934
  2. 8 MINOR PARTY LEGISLATORS WIN
  3. 1st MINOR PARTY U.S. SENATOR SINCE 1946
  4. D.C. MAY EASE BALLOT ACCESS
  5. LAWSUIT NEWS
  6. 2003 ACTIVITY FOR INITIATIVES & IRV
  7. BALLOT ACCESS BILLS
  8. INITIATIVE RESULTS
  9. MISSOURI WRITE-INS CANDIDATES WIN
  10. ELECTION RETURNS
  11. 2002 OCTOBER REGISTRATION TOTALS
  12. 2004 PETITIONING FOR PRESIDENT
  13. 2002 VOTE FOR THE OFFICE AT TOP OF BALLOT
  14. MINOR PARTIES WON LOCAL ELECTIONS
  15. N.Y. PARTY MAY ALTER PRIMARY
  16. CHANGES IN PARTY BALLOT STATUS

MINOR PARTY AND INDEPENDENT VOTE FOR TOP OFFICES IS BEST MID-TERM RESULT SINCE 1934

On November 5, 2002, 5.3% of the vote for the most important office on the ballots of the various states went to minor party and independent candidates. This is the first time since 1934 that the "other" vote for the top offices in a mid-term year has exceeded 5%.

"Most important office" is defined as Governor. For the 14 states that didn't elect a Governor, "most important office" means U.S. Senator. Four states didn't have either a gubernatorial or a U.S. Senate election. For those states, the office at the top of the ballot is used: Secretary of State in Indiana, and U.S. House in North Dakota, Utah and Washington.

The calculation doesn't include votes cast in fusion states for minor party nominees for the most important office who were also the nominees of one of the two major parties. Thus, the Conservative and Working Families gubernatorial vote in New York is included in the major party column, not the "other" column. The calculation omits votes cast for "None of the Above" in Nevada, and miscellaneous write-ins in all states.

Using the same rules for previous mid-term years gives these results:

1934: 5.6%
1938: 3.8%
1942: 4.8%
1946: 1.4%
1950: 1.1%
1954:   .6%
1958:   .9%
1962: 1.1%
1966: 3.2%
1970: 3.4%
1974: 2.4%
1978: 2.4%
1982: 1.8%
1986: 3.6%
1990: 4.6%
1994: 4.5%
1998: 4.9%
2002: 5.3%

Ironically, no minor party or independent candidates were elected to the most important office in any state in 2002. During the last 100 years, in mid-term years, such candidates did win at least one race in 1914 (California), 1930 (Minnesota and Oregon), 1934 (Minnesota and Wisconsin), 1942 (Wisconsin), 1970 (Virginia), 1974 (Maine), 1990 (Alaska and Connecticut), 1994 (Maine) and 1998 (Maine and Minnesota).

The Republican Party scored a strong victory in this election, if one looks at the top-most office in each state. Republicans polled 50.7% of the total vote, whereas the Democrats only polled 44.0%. If one assigns "electoral votes" to the party that won the top-most office in each state, the Republicans would have had 311 "electoral votes" and the Democrats 227. See below for a chart showing each state.


8 MINOR PARTY LEGISLATORS WIN

Eight nominees of minor parties, all of whom are members of those minor parties, were elected to state legislatures on November 5, 2002. This is the highest number of minor party state legislators elected at one time since 1992, when there were also eight elected (4 Libertarians in New Hampshire, 3 Progressives in Vermont, and one Alaskan Independence in Alaska).

The eight winners in 2002: 4 Progressives in Vermont, 1 Green in Maine, 1 Working Families in New York, 1 Republican Moderate in Alaska (the Republican Moderate Party is a fully-qualified party, entirely separate from the Republican Party), and 1 Independence Party member in Minnesota. The latter two are State Senators. They are the first minor party member-candidates elected to a State Senate since 1970, when the Tennessee American Party elected one.


1st MINOR PARTY U.S. SENATOR SINCE 1946

Dean Barkley, appointed to the U.S. Senate on November 4, 2002 by Minnesota Governor Jesse Ventura, is the first member of a minor party in the U.S. Senate since 1946, when Robert La Follette, Jr., left the Progressive Party. Barkley is one of the pioneers of the Minnesota Independence Party. Barkley was appointed to fill the two-month vacancy created in October, 2002.

Although the New York Conservative Party elected its nominee, James Buckley, to the Senate in 1970, he was always a registered Republican.


D.C. MAY EASE BALLOT ACCESS

On November 7, city councilman Vincent Orange introduced B14-952, which would abolish mandatory petitions for all candidates (except presidential candidates). The bill would let non-presidential candidates pay a filing fee. The fee would be $2,000 for Mayor and Delegate to Congress, and $1,000 for Council-at-large and Chair of the Council.

Under existing law, independent candidates for those offices need 3,000 signatures; candidates seeking a place on the primary ballot of a qualified party need 2,000, or 1% of that party's registration, whichever is less.

The motivation for the bill comes from the failure of the incumbent Mayor, Anthony Williams, to qualify for the Democratic primary ballot this year. He had to run a write-in campaign, which he won.

D.C. Libertarians plan to ask Councilman Orange to amend his bill to include president. The existing presidential petition, 1% of the number of registered voters, is so difficult that many minor party presidential candidates have failed to qualify, including Pat Buchanan, John Hagelin and Howard Phillips in 2000.


LAWSUIT NEWS

1. Alabama: on November 8, Johnny Swanson, a write-in candidate for U.S. Senate, sued the state in federal court for failing to canvass his write-in votes. Swanson v Bennett, 02-A-1244-N, m.d. Alabama is one of the states that permits write-ins, and doesn't have a procedure for a serious write-in candidate to file a declaration of write-in candidacy. Under the law, the state ought to canvass all write-ins, but in fact it mostly ignores them. This case could set an important precedent.

2. Alaska: the Green Party polled 3% for all its statewide candidates except Governor. Under the law, the gubernatorial race is the only one that counts, so the party was disqualified. The party will file a lawsuit in state court, alleging that the law violates the State Constitution, and that the state ought to look at all statewide races. The Alaska Constitution has more protection for ballot access than the U.S. Constitution.

3. California: on November 7, the State Supreme Court ruled that the State Constitution does not require write-in space on run-off ballots. Edelstein v San Francisco, 102530. State law says write-ins are permitted in "any election", but the Court majority said that a run-off is not included in the phrase "any election". Plaintiffs have asked for a rehearing, pointing out numerous places in the Election Code where it is obvious that a run-off election is an election.

4. Georgia: on October 25, a hearing was held in Fulton Co. Superior Court in Dickson v Secretary of State, 00-cv-27164. The Green Party argues that the 5% petition requirement for district office violates the State Constitution.

6. Illinois: on October 25, the State Appellate Court ruled that a party that was qualified in a single district does not lose that status, just because the district's boundaries changed as a result of redistricting. The decision affirms the lower court ruling, which kept the Libertarian Party on the ballot in several legislative districts. Preuter v State Officers Electoral Board, 1-02-2545.

Illinois (2): on September 9, a lawsuit was filed in federal court against the 25,000-signature requirement to run for Mayor of Chicago in the non-partisan primary. If no relief is granted, incumbent Mayor Richard M. Daley may be the only candidate listed on the ballot. Chagin v Bd. of Elec. Cmsrs of Chicago, 02-c-6378. The case is before Judge Charles Norgle, a Reagan appointee.

7. Kansas: on October 30, the Secretary of State and the Natural Law Party tentatively settled the lawsuit against a law that says parties must have one-word names. The Secretary of State will not defend the law, and promised to ask the legislature to repeal it. If the legislature does not act, the case will return to court in May 2003. Natural Law Party v Thornburgh, 02-2390-JWL.

8. New York: the Green Party will soon file a lawsuit, alleging that voters have a right to remain registered as Greens, even though the party lost its qualified status this month. Similar cases have won in New Jersey, Colorado and Oklahoma.


2003 ACTIVITY FOR INITIATIVES & IRV

The Center for Voting & Democracy, which promotes proportional representation, believes that Vermont and New Mexico may approve Instant-Runoff voting bills in 2003.

Citizens in Charge is an organization dedicated to expanding the list of states that have the initiative process. The organization will concentrate in 2003 on Minnesota and New York.


BALLOT ACCESS BILLS

Activists in many states are already working to find sponsors for bills to improve ballot access laws. Such bills will probably be introduced in at least 15 states. In Nebraska and West Virginia, the Secretary of State has indicated an interest in helping.

Two powerful Democratic state legislators who have blocked ballot access reform in the past were defeated on November 5, 2002: Georgia House speaker Tom Murphy, and Texas House Elections Committee chair Debra Danburg.


INITIATIVE RESULTS

Several ballot measures on November 5 would have altered election laws:

1. California: the voters defeated same-day registration.

2. Colorado: the voters defeated same-day registration. They also defeated all-mail ballots. They also turned down a system to end the caucus system, by which candidates in primary elections who have support from a party meeting are automatically put on the primary ballot; whereas others must complete a difficult petition. But the voters approved restrictive campaign contribution limits in state races.

3. Massachusetts: public financing was repealed by the voters. Also, in two districts, voters told their legislators to support IRV.

4. Michigan: the straight-ticket device (also called the party lever, or the party circle) will continue to exist, because the voters voted for it.

5. Montana: a measure to make it more difficult for initiatives to get on the ballot passed. It creates a county distribution requirement.

6. Oregon: a measure to make it more difficult for initiatives to get on the ballot was approved. It bans paying circulators on a per signature basis.


MISSOURI WRITE-INS CANDIDATES WIN

On November 5, two write-in candidates were elected to Missouri city offices. Lana Wright was elected Alderman in Frontenac, and Kenny McClendon was elected councilman-at-large in Berkeley.


ELECTION RETURNS

The next issues of Ballot Access News will contain more November 5 election results for federal and state office. There are many interesting outcomes that have not been reported in the mainstream press. For example, over 400,000 votes were cast in Florida for Libertarian candidates for State House. This was over 10% of the vote cast in the state for that office.


2002 OCTOBER REGISTRATION TOTALS

Dem.

Rep.

Indp, misc

Constitut.

Green

Libt

Reform

Nat Law

other

Alaska

72,323

116,450

239,220

5

4,789

7,230

58

7

20,843

Arizona

799,653

925,485

487,487

?

2,296

14,259

?

?

- -

Calif.

6,825,400

5,388,895

2,368,974

299,231

155,952

90,495

58,482

44,561

71,479

Colorado

863,405

1,048,967

940,016

137

5,248

5,543

379

982

- -

Conn.

682,478

462,338

842,920

238

1,538

741

88

2

- -

Delaware

223,999

175,358

117,857

255

586

762

263

301

346

Dt. Col.

275,579

27,481

55,209

?

4,899

?

?

?

- -

Florida

3,958,910

3,599,053

1,715,175

336

5,590

11,852

4,630

310

6,504

Iowa

529,605

582,303

696,031

- -

1,885

- -

- -

- -

- -

Kansas

441,269

742,903

420,261

- -

- -

9,416

1,850

- -

- -

Kentucky

1,571,541

908,031

169,512

?

?

?

?

?

- -

Louis'na

1,613,443

637,427

521,379

37

667

1,170

2,806

22

- -

Maine

288,524

269,237

341,061

?

13,272

?

?

?

- -

Maryland

1,534,787

819,046

367,985

262

3,905

6,213

1,159

?

- -

Mass.

1,442,897

530,512

1,969,962

26

6,729

20,578

1,883

64

- -

Nebraska

382,092

544,122

152,891

?

155

3,405

?

?

1,185

Nevada

355,303

363,295

126,846

15,776

2,332

4,891

614

744

- -

N. Hamp.

170,405

245,791

242,028

?

?

?

?

?

- -

N. Jersey

1,170,475

900,969

2,583,827

29

278

208

44

22

- -

N. Mex.

495,024

310,175

125,886

14

14,832

4,974

?

54

60

N. York

5,255,521

3,132,161

2,257,070

- -

29,528

- -

- -

- -

572,082

No. Car.

2,436,903

1,727,317

865,738

?

?

8,903

9

?

- -

Okla.

1,099,075

755,103

212,386

?

?

286

17

?

- -

Oregon

729,704

679,555

431,643

1,499

12,893

14,265

?

193

461

Pennsyl.

3,759,199

3,219,719

813,846

?

4,611

?

?

?

- -

Rhode Is.

261,298

70,170

325,672

?

669

?

?

?

986

So. Dak.

183,343

228,200

63,171

?

?

1,148

122

?

- -

Utah

67,770

263,631

990,523

81

2,086

1,836

147

62

- -

W. Va.

641,442

309,280

109,963

?

?

?

?

?

207

Wyo.

65,775

148,925

26,192

?

?

281

5

22

- -

TOTAL

38,197,142

29,131,899

20,580,731

317,926

274,740

208,456

72,556

47,346

674,153

Percent

42.68%

32.55%

22.99%

.36%

.31%

.23%

.08%

.05%

.75%

The parties in the "Other" column are: in Alas., 17,798 Alaskan Independence and 3,045 Republican Moderate; Peace & Freedom in Cal.; Independent Pty. in Del.; Nebraska Party in Neb.; Independent Coalition in N.M.; these N.Y. parties: Independence 257,281, Conservative 163,314, Liberal 86,242, Right to Life 49,482, Working Families 15,763; Socialist in Ore.; Cool Moose in R.I.; Mountain in West Virginia. All data is Sep. or Oct., except that Maine and Pa. data is from June.

A dash means that the voters are not permitted to register into a particular party. A question mark means that the state has not tabulated the number of registrants in a particular party.

Totals summer 2002 were: Dem. 37,947,236 (42.85%), Rep. 28,804,361 (32.52%), Indp. & misc. 20,281,695 (22.90%), Constitution 325,828 (.37%), Green 246,854 (.28%), Libertarian 200,503 (.23%), Reform 81,208 (.09%), Natural Law 53,498 (.06%), other parties 624,295 (.70%).

Totals October 2000 were: Dem. 38,529,264 (43.84%), Rep. 28,813,511 (32.78%), Indp. & misc. 18,999,126 (21.62%), Constitution 348,977 (.40%), Libertarian 224,713 (.26%), Green 193,332 (.22%), Reform 99,408 (.11%), Natural Law 61,405 (.07%), other parties 620,668 (.71%).

Totals October 1998 were: Dem. 37,425,660 (44.94%), Rep. 27,695,767 (33.26%), Indp. & misc. 16,804,922 (20.18%), Constitution (then called U.S. Taxpayers) 317,510 (.38%), Reform 245,831 (.30%), Libertarian 179,255 (.22%), Green 118,537 (.14%), Natural Law 70,032 (.08%), other parties 424,101 (.51%).

Totals October 1996 were: Dem. 36,946,324 (45.68%), Rep. 27,323,046 (33.78%), Indp. & misc. 15,227,612 (18.83%), Constitution 306,900 (.38%), Reform 207,933 (.26%), Libertarian 162,545 (.20%), Green 112,199 (.14%), Natural Law 85,853 (.11%), other parties 328,833 (.63%).


2004 PETITIONING FOR PRESIDENT

State
Requirements
Signatures Collected
Deadline
x
Full Party
Candidate
Lib'n
Green
Nat Law
Const
Reform

Alabama

41,012

5,000

500

0

0

0

0

Aug 31

Alaska

(reg) 6,925

#2,845

already on

reg 4,789

0

0

0

Aug 4

Ariz.

16,348

est. #10,000

already on

0

0

0

0

Jun 9

Arkansas

10,000

1,000

0

0

0

0

0

Aug 2

Calif.

est. (reg) 76,000

157,073

already on

already on

already on

already on

58,731

Aug 6

Colorado

(reg) 1,000

pay fee

already on

already on

already on

already on

already on

July 5

Connecticut

no procedure

#7,500

0

already on

0

0

0

Aug 7

Delaware

est. (reg) 270

est. 5,400

already on

already on

already on

255

already on

Aug 21

D.C.

no procedure

est. #3,600

can't start

already on

can't start

can't start

can't start

Aug 17

Florida

be organized

93,024

already on

already on

already on

already on

already on

Sep 1

Georgia

37,153

#37,153

already on

can't start

can't start

can't start

can't start

July 13

Hawaii

677

3,711

already on

already on

already on

0

0

Sep 3

Idaho

10,033

5,017

already on

0

already on

already on

0

Aug 31

Illinois

no procedure

#25,000

can't start

can't start

can't start

can't start

can't start

Jun 21

Indiana

no procedure

#29,553

already on

0

0

0

0

Jul 1

Iowa

no procedure

#1,500

0

0

0

0

0

Aug 13

Kansas

16,477

5,000

already on

0

0

0

already on

Aug 2

Kentucky

no procedure

#5,000

0

0

0

0

0

Aug 26

La.

est. (reg) 140,000

pay fee

1,170

667

22

37

2,806

Sep 7

Maine

24,798

#4,000

0

already on

0

0

0

Aug 9

Maryland

10,000

est. 28,000

1,000

finished

0

0

0

Aug 2

Mass.

est. (reg) 38,000

#10,000

already on

already on

0

0

0

July 27

Michigan

31,731

31,731

already on

already on

already on

already on

already on

July 15

Minnesota

112,557

#2,000

0

already on

0

0

0

Sep 14

Mississippi

be organized

#1,000

already on

already on

already on

already on

already on

Sep 3

Missouri

10,000

10,000

already on

0

0

0

0

July 26

Montana

5,000

#5,000

already on

already on

already on

0

already on

July 28

Nebraska

4,735

2,500

0

0

0

0

0

Aug 24

Nevada

4,994

4,994

already on

already on

already on

already on

0

July 9

New Hamp.

13,260

#3,000

0

0

0

0

0

Aug 11

New Jersey

no procedure

#800

0

0

0

0

0

July 26

New Mex.

2,347

14,079

already on

already on

0

0

0

Sep 7

New York

no procedure

#15,000

can't start

can't start

can't start

can't start

can't start

Aug 17

No. Car.

58,842

est. 99,000

already on

4,000

0

0

0

Jun 25

No. Dakota

7,000

4,000

can't start

can't start

can't start

can't start

can't start

Sep 3

Ohio

31,772

5,000

8,000

0

0

0

0

Aug 19

Oklahoma

51,781

37,027

0

0

0

0

0

Jul 15

Oregon

18,381

15,306

already on

already on

0

already on

0

Aug 24

Penn.

no procedure

est. 23,000

can't start

can't start

can't start

can't start

can't start

Aug 2

Rhode Isl.

15,865

#1,000

can't start

already on

can't start

can't start

can't start

Sep 3

So. Caro.

10,000

10,000

already on

0

already on

already on

already on

Jul 15

So. Dakota

8,364

#3,346

0

0

0

0

0

Aug 3

Tennessee

41,314

25

0

0

0

2,200

0

Aug 19

Texas

45,253

64,077

can't start

can't start

can't start

can't start

can't start

May 24

Utah

2,000

#1,000

already on

already on

already on

0

0

Aug 31

Vermont

be organized

#1,000

already on

0

0

0

0

Sep 16

Virginia

no procedure

#10,000

can't start

can't start

can't start

can't start

can't start

Aug 20

Washington

no procedure

#200

already on

can't start

can't start

can't start

can't start

Aug 25

West Va.

no procedure

#12,963

0

0

0

0

0

Aug 2

Wisconsin

10,000

#2,000

already on

already on

0

already on

can't start

Sep 14

Wyoming

3,710

3,710

already on

0

0

0

0

Aug 17

Total States On
26
19
12
10
8

2002 VOTE FOR THE OFFICE AT TOP OF BALLOT

Rep.

Dem.

Lib't.

Green

Nat Law

Const.

Reform

other pty*

Indep.

Alabama

672,225

669,105

23,272

- -

- -

- -

- -

- -

- -

Alaska

129,110

94,015

1,107

2,921

- -

- -

- -

3,670

- -

Arizona

554,465

566,284

20,356

- -

- -

- -

- -

- -

84,947

Arkansas

429,450

375,412

36

- -

- -

- -

- -

- -

- -

Calif.

3,106,392

3,469,712

158,186

381,778

86,463

125,389

- -

- -

- -

Colorado

840,331

449,067

19,317

30,385

- -

- -

- -

- -

- -

Conn.

573,134

448,441

- -

- -

- -

- -

- -

- -

- -

Del.

94,793

135,253

922

- -

350

- -

- -

996

- -

D.C.

45,407

79,841

- -

3,240

- -

- -

- -

702

1,150

Florida

2,856,845

2,201,427

172

- -

- -

- -

- -

68

42,039

Georgia

1,040,001

937,057

47,963

- -

- -

- -

- -

- -

- -

Hawaii

197,009

179,647

1,364

- -

2,561

- -

- -

382

1,147

Idaho

231,566

171,711

8,187

- -

- -

- -

- -

- -

- -

Illinois

1,588,868

1,824,211

73,404

- -

- -

- -

- -

- -

22,803

Indiana

789,261

627,416

60,937

- -

- -

- -

- -

- -

- -

Iowa

456,615

540,449

13,048

14,628

- -

- -

- -

- -

- -

Kansas

371,451

435,634

7,936

- -

- -

- -

8,781

- -

- -

Kentucky

726,396

400,818

- -

- -

- -

- -

- -

- -

- -

Louisiana

632,702

596,900

2,423

- -

- -

- -

- -

- -

14,308

Maine

205,335

233,543

- -

46,179

- -

- -

- -

- -

10,894

Maryland

879,592

813,422

11,546

- -

- -

- -

- -

- -

- -

Mass.

1,088,246

980,977

23,271

76,331

- -

- -

- -

- -

15,264

Michigan

1,504,445

1,629,950

- -

25,236

- -

12,414

- -

- -

- -

Minn.

999,473

821,268

- -

50,589

- -

2,537

- -

367,560

9,698

Miss.

521,482

- -

- -

- -

- -

- -

94,127

- -

- -

Missouri

935,032

913,778

18,345

10,465

- -

- -

- -

- -

- -

Montana

103,362

204,545

10,404

7,639

- -

- -

- -

- -

- -

Nebraska

325,453

129,691

- -

- -

- -

- -

- -

18,269

- -

Nevada

344,001

110,935

8,104

4,775

- -

7,047

- -

- -

5,543

N. Hamp.

259,663

169,277

13,028

- -

- -

- -

- -

- -

- -

N. Jersey

910,628

1,112,542

12,375

24,066

- -

- -

- -

9,034

- -

N. Mex.

182,721

261,198

- -

25,364

- -

- -

- -

- -

- -

N. York

2,159,348

1,455,961

9,076

40,762

- -

- -

- -

715,674

- -

No. Car.

1,248,664

1,047,983

33,807

- -

- -

- -

- -

- -

- -

No. Dak.

109,646

120,774

- -

- -

- -

- -

- -

- -

- -

Ohio

1,837,553

1,214,950

- -

- -

- -

- -

- -

- -

- -

Okla.

441,277

448,143

- -

- -

124,601

- -

- -

- -

146,200

Oregon

567,911

601,348

56,141

- -

- -

- -

- -

- -

- -

Penn.

1,584,566

1,898,214

40,817

38,080

- -

- -

- -

- -

- -

R.I.

176,124

145,228

- -

- -

- -

- -

- -

- -

- -

S.Car.

580,459

518,288

- -

- -

- -

- -

- -

- -

- -

S.Dak.

189,920

140,263

1,983

- -

- -

- -

- -

- -

2,393

Tenn.

786,402

837,484

1,584

- -

- -

- -

- -

- -

27,073

Texas

2,617,106

1,809,915

66,100

32,094

- -

- -

- -

- -

- -

Utah

314,457

217,048

6,984

6,413

- -

- -

- -

- -

- -

Vermont

103,436

97,565

938

- -

- -

- -

- -

2,776

25,297

Virginia

1,298,843

- -

105,046

- -

- -

- -

- -

- -

145,102

Wash.

778,922

907,440

48,677

4,077

- -

- -

- -

- -

- -

W.Va.

158,211

271,314

- -

- -

- -

- -

- -

- -

- -

Wisc.

732,796

800,971

185,085

44,077

- -

- -

2,835

- -

5,249

Wyoming

88,873

92,662

3,924

- -

- -

- -

- -

- -

- -

TOTAL

39,369,968

34,209,077

1,095,865

869,099

213,975

147,387

105,743

1,128,165

559,107

Ak.: Alaskan Independence 2,175; Republican Moderate 1,495. Del.: Independent. D.C: Soc. Workers. Fla.: Christian 44; Soc. Workers 24. Hi.: Free Energy. Minn.: 364,534 Independence; Soc. Workers 3,026. Neb.: Nebraska Party. N.J.: Conservative 6,371; Soc. 2,663. N.Y.: Independence 633,582; Right to Life 42,990; Marijuana Reform 22,574; Liberal 16,528. Vt.: Progressive 1,380; Grassroots 771; Liberty Union 625.


MINOR PARTIES WON LOCAL ELECTIONS

Green Party: besides the Maine legislative election win on page one, the Green Party won another partisan election in Providence, Rhode Island, for city council. David Segal was elected in a 4-person race with 37.5% of the vote, defeating a Democrat, Republican and Independent.

35 Greens were elected to non-partisan office on November 5, including a County Council seat in Hawaii County, Hawaii, which was a partisan office until it was made non-partisan a few years ago. The party also elected a County Commissioner in Winona County, Minnesota. Also, a Green was elected Mayor of Cass Lake, Minnesota, and Greens won for city council in these California cities: Apple Valley, Arcata, Berkeley, Buellton, Point Arena, Santa Monica, Santa Cruz, Sebastopol, Sonoma, Truckee, and Yucaipa. Other offices were won in Iowa, Nebraska, North Carolina and Texas.

Libertarian Party: won five partisan races: (1) San Miguel County, Colorado, sheriff; (2) San Miguel County Coroner; (3-4) two Grand Isle Co., Vermont, Justices of the Peace; (5) Needham Township Bd., Johnson Co., Indiana.

36 Libertarians were elected to non-partisan office on November 5: California (24), Florida (4), Georgia (1), North Carolina (6) and South Carolina (1). These included two city council seats, in Moreno Valley, California, and Hoschton, Georgia. Most of the wins were to special-purpose governmental bodies, such as Park or Soil Boards.

Independence Party of Minnesota: besides a State Senator, elected a County Commissioner in Chisago County.


N.Y. PARTY MAY ALTER PRIMARY

The New York Independence Party will decide on February 1 whether to invite all registered independent voters to vote in its primary. In the past, all New York primary elections, for all parties, have been "closed", which means only registered members of those parties could vote in party primaries.


CHANGES IN PARTY BALLOT STATUS

Relative to December 1, 2000, the following changes have occurred in party ballot status:

  1. Constitution: has gained Michigan, and lost Delaware, Kansas, New Mexico and Vermont.
  2. Green: has gained Mississippi and lost Alaska, Iowa, New York and Texas. The party has also upgraded its status in New Mexico from qualified minor party, to qualified major party.
  3. Libertarian: has gained Hawaii, Michigan, Nevada, New Mexico, North Carolina; has lost Alabama, Maryland, South Dakota and Texas. The party has also upgraded its status in Wyoming from qualified minor party to qualified major party, and now has semi-status in Pennsylvania so that its registrants will be tallied.
  4. Natural Law: has gained Michigan, and lost New Mexico, Oregon and Vermont.
  5. Reform: has lost California, Idaho and South Dakota.

Leaders of the Kansas Reform Party are considering affiliating that state party with the national Constitution Party.

One-state parties: these parties lost qualified status: Republican Moderate in Alaska, Liberal and Right-to-Life in New York, and Cool Moose in Rhode Island. A new party, the Independent Democratic Party, has just gained qualified status in Florida.

ERRATA: the Nov. 1 B.A.N. omitted two candidates from its State House chart. There were 10 Greens in Pennsylvania, not 9; and there was a Reform nominee in Wisconsin. These corrections have been made to the online version.


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