July 1, 2004 Ė Volume 20, Number 3

This issue was originally printed on white paper.

Table of Contents

  1. LOUISIANA PASSES BILL TO EASE DEFINITION OF "PARTY"
  2. ALABAMA INNOVATION
  3. FOUR CALIFORNIA BILLS ADVANCE
  4. AMERICAN CANDIDATE TV SHOW UNDERWAY
  5. LAWSUIT NEWS
  6. LEGISLATIVE NEWS
  7. BOOK REVIEW: OTHERS
  8. BOOK REVIEW: THE CANDIDATEís HANDBOOK
  9. JUNE (AND LATE MAY) DEMOCRATIC PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARIES
  10. 2004 PETITIONING FOR PRESIDENT
  11. LIBERTARIANS NOMINATE BADNARIK
  12. LIBERTARIAN CONVENTION VOTE FOR PRESIDENT
  13. WORKERS WORLD NOMINATES
  14. NADER PICKS V-P, GETS MATCHING $$
  15. SOCIALIST WORKERS NOMINATES
  16. INDEPENDENCE PARTY
  17. GREEN PARTY
  18. SUBSCRIBING TO BAN WITH PAYPAL


LOUISIANA PASSES BILL TO EASE DEFINITION OF "PARTY"

BIGGEST LEGISLATIVE GAIN IN ANY STATE IN FIVE YEARS

On June 21, the Louisiana legislature passed HB 1605, which greatly liberalizes the definition of "political party". The bill defines "party" to be a group that has registration membership of 1,000, or which polled 5% of the vote in the last presidential election for president, or which polled 5% for any statewide race in the last election for statewide state office.

The old law says a qualified party is one with registration of 5% of the state total, or one that polled 5% for president in the last election. Under the old law, only the Democratic and Republican Parties are qualified. The 5% registration standard requires about 140,000 registrations.

Assuming Governor Kathleen Blanco signs the bill, it will go into effect January 1, 2005. The Green, Libertarian and Reform Parties are sure to qualify under the registration option. New parties must pay a $1,000 fee.

Only parties with registration of 5% will elect party officers in a primary; small qualified parties will choose them by convention. All parties will qualify for a presidential primary.

Candidate ballot access is easy in Louisiana. A fairly modest fee puts anyone on the ballot. However, under existing law, unless the candidate is a member of a qualified party, or unless the candidate is running for president, he or she gets no party label on the ballot. Therefore, parties are handicapped when they arenít recognized, since their candidates (except for president) have no label.

The only qualified parties in the last eighty-five years in Louisiana have been: (1) States Rights Party, 1956-1960; (2) American Party, 1968-1972; (3) Prudence, Actions, Results 1992-1996; and (4) Reform 1996-2000. The "Prudence, Action, Results" Party was created in 1992 because Ross Perot used that label and he polled over 5% for president.

Under HB 1605, independent candidates will have "no-party candidate" printed on the ballot next to their names. The Coalition for Free & Open Elections (COFOE) had sponsored a lawsuit to overturn the old law, at least relative to independent candidates. The case, Rosenthal v McKeithen, has been pending since 2000 and still hadnít had a hearing, but the lawsuit will now be moot, assuming the Governor signs the bill.

Except for Michigan in 2002, Louisiana is the only state to have voluntarily eased the definition of "party" since 1999. The years 2000-2004 have been bleak for legislative help for minor parties. There have been improvements since 2000, but they have mostly come about by lawsuits, not improvements by state legislators.


ALABAMA INNOVATION

On June 7, the Alabama Secretary of State and the Alabama Attorney General agreed to let three different independent presidential candidates use the same petition. With a single signature, a voter can help Ralph Nader, Michael Badnarik, and David Cobb get on the ballot as independent presidential candidates this year. 5,000 signatures are required for any independent presidential candidate to get on the Alabama ballot.

Since the law lets voters sign for multiple independent presidential candidates, no one in Alabama state government could find any reason to disallow the use of a single petition to qualify all three candidates. As most readers already know, Nader is a true independent candidate; Badnarik is the Libertarian nominee; Cobb may be the Green nominee. Supporters of all three candidates are cooperating to circulate this petition. The petition makes it clear to potential signers that, by their signature, they are assisting three different candidates.


FOUR CALIFORNIA BILLS ADVANCE

Party rights: on June 21, the Senate passed SCA 18, which says that if a political party participates in a primary election, it has a right to have its nominee on the general election ballot. Since it is a constitutional amendment, the voters will vote on it in November (assuming it passes the Assembly soon). If it gets more votes than the "Voter Choice Open Primary", and they both pass, the measure with the higher vote totals wins. See the April 1 B.A.N. for a description of the "Voter Choice" initiative.

Primary date: on June 15, the Assembly Elections Committee passed SB 1730. The bill moves all primaries, even the presidential primary, from March to June. If the bill passes, the deadline to qualify a new party will automatically be eased by three months.

Election reform: on June 16, Senate Elections Committee passed SCA 14, by Senator John Vasconcellos. It includes a vast array of election changes: public funding of campaigns; instant-runoff voting; redistricting reform; a larger legislature; a relaxation of term limits to 12 years; and a non-binding "none of the above" provision. It also lowers the legislative two-thirds rule for budget approval to 55%. Also, it requires parties to let independents vote in their primaries, and prohibits campaign consultants and lobbyists from working in the same firm.

Audit trail: on June 15, the Assembly Elections Committee passed SB 1438. It requires electronic voting machines to print a paper record of each voterís ballot. The voter can see this record, but canít take it with him or her. Three county elections officials bitterly opposed the bill, but they failed to sway a single vote.


AMERICAN CANDIDATE TV SHOW UNDERWAY

"The American Candidate" TV show will start broadcasting on August 1. But the process by which the twelve initial contestants will be whittled down to two is already underway.

Four of the seven remaining contestants are either members of a minor party, or are involved with election reform issues. They are:

Bruce Friedrich: Green Party member, 34, lives near Norfolk, Virginia, and is an official of PETA, People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals.

Malia Lazu: independent, 27, on the Board of the Center for Voting and Democracy. She lives in Takoma Park, Maryland. She formerly lived in Boston, where she founded Boston Vote.

Richard Mack: Libertarian, 51, of Provo, Utah. He was sheriff of Graham County, Arizona, and was the Libertarian candidate for Governor of Utah this year. However, he dropped out in order to appear on the show.

Joyce Riley: Libertarian, 55, radio talk show host in Versailles, Missouri, but until recently lived in Arkansas City, Kansas.

Also, one Republican (Park Gillespie) and two Democrats (Keith Boykin and Lisa Witter) are running.

The original twelve contestantsí first duty was to organize a campaign rally in a place of their own choosing. They could only spend $100 and had only a few hours to plan the rally. The contestants with the fewest attendees were dropped.

Then, each of the eight survivors joined a bus tour. They were not told where they were going. But when they got to the destination, they appeared jointly. Each appealed to as many individuals as possible to telephone a particular phone number. At each stage, those with the fewest incoming phone calls from that one particular state are dropped. The first joint appearance was Keene, New Hampshire, on June 12. The second was Allentown, Pennsylvania; then Charlottesville, Virginia.


LAWSUIT NEWS

Alabama: a U.S. Senate candidate who was excluded from the June 1 Democratic primary this year has filed a lawsuit in federal court to require a new primary, this time with his name on the ballot. The Democratic Party excluded him from this yearís primary because, two years ago, he tried to be an independent candidate. Swanson v Democratic Party, 2:04-cv-534, middle dist.

California: the hearing in Terry Baumís lawsuit to gain a place on the ballot has been postponed to July 15. Baum is the Green Party nominee for U.S. House in San Francisco.

Colorado: on June 7, the U.S. Supreme Court refused to hear the Republican appeal of a redistricting decision from the State Supreme Court. The State Supreme Court had ruled that the Colorado constitution does not permit redistricting more than once per decade. In the U.S. Supreme Court, the case was General Assembly v Salazar, 03-1082.

Dist. of Columbia: on June 4, the D.C. Court of Appeals ordered the government to count write-in votes in the Green Partyís presidential primary. Best v D.C.Bd of Elections, 04-AA-45. D.C. has a law excusing the Board from counting write-in votes if the vote-counting computer says the total number of write-ins is less than the winnerís vote total. But in this case, 31% of the voters cast a write-in, more than enough to potentially entitle the recipient of the write-in votes to some delegates to the partyís national convention.

Guam: on June 10, a Superior Court ruled that Guamís blanket primary is unconstitutional, even though no political party complained about that primary. The Attorney General of Guam brought the lawsuit. A.G. v Guam Election Commission, 03-345. On June 16 the legislature changed the primary to an open primary.

Oklahoma: a hearing was held in Libertarian Political Organization v Clingman, 2004-2949, on June 25. The issue is whether the stateís 5% petition requirement for new parties violates the State Constitution.

Kansas: a state court is adjudicating an internal dispute in the Republican Party, over whether the party desires to invite independents into its primary or not. The partyís state chair approved the idea, but the state central committee did not. The Secretary of State believes that the state chair has the authority to set policy, so now the partyís other officers are suing the Secretary of State. Estes v Thornburgh, Shawnee Co. 04-c-813.

Ohio: on June 14, an independent candidate for U.S. House filed a lawsuit in federal court in Cincinnati, alleging that the March 1 petition deadline for independent candidates (for office other than president) is too early. Lawrence v Blackwell, 1:04-cv-398.

Pennsylvania: the U.S. Supreme Court still hasnít said whether it will hear Zulick v Wise, 03-1300, the case on whether a state can enforce a "sore loser" law only against minor party nominees, but not against major party nominees.

Washington: on June 10, the State Supreme Court ruled that the state should hold an open primary this year, to replace the old blanket primary. Washington State Grange v Locke, 75384-9.

Washington (2): on May 24, the state asked the U.S. Supreme Court to overturn a ruling of the 9th circuit that said the Voting Rights Act can be used to overturn a state ban on felons registering to vote, if the evidence shows that the stateís criminal justice policies are racially discriminatory. Locke v Farrakhan, 03-1597.


LEGISLATIVE NEWS

Alaska: as expected, HB 414 became law on June 5. The Governor did not sign it, but he let it become law without his signature. Starting in 2006, it makes it more difficult for minor parties to remain on the ballot. The new law is almost certainly unconstitutional, since a judge issued an injunction against the old law last year.

Hawaii: HB1521, which would repeal the law that petition signers must put their Social Security number on petitions, failed to pass.

Delaware: on June 17, the Senate passed SB 252, which makes it easier for minor parties to qualify for the ballot. Parties qualify for the ballot by registering voters equal to one-twentieth of 1% of the state registration. The bill doesnít change that. But under existing law, no one can change parties between April and November of even-numbered years. The bill would eliminate this restriction.

Illinois: the regular session of the legislature adjourned without having passed SB2123, to ease the deadline for President Bush to be put on the ballot. But it may pass in a special session, probably in July.

Maine: the Governor signed LD212 into law on April 1. It requires the Secretary of State to study Instant-Runoff Voting by January 2005.

West Virginia: the Governor signed SB 190 into law on February 3. It lowers the filing fee for presidential candidates from $4,000 to $2,500.


BOOK REVIEW: OTHERS

OTHERS, by Darcy G. Richardson, published 2004 by iUniverse. Hardcover, 668 pages. $47.95.

The sub-title is "Third-Party Politics from the Nationís Founding to the Rise and Fall of the Greenback-Labor Party." Although there have been many histories of U.S. minor political parties, there has never been a general book on this subject that goes into such detail. Others is only the first in a series of four books, each covering a different segment of time. The other volumes arenít out yet.

On 350 occasions before 1889, a minor party nominee was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives. This does not include independents elected to the House, nor does it include winners who were classed as "independent Democrats" or "independent Republicans". Others covers U.S. history from the beginnings of the nation, through 1889. The book is jam-packed with stories about many of these individuals, as well as the individuals who ran for president, and the U.S. Senate, and for state and local office, on minor party tickets. The richness of minor party history is the U.S. in the 19th century is brought to life by Others.

The book includes a great deal of political history for the major parties as well. It contains hundreds of mini-biographies of the people who propelled 19th century political parties.

The period covered by Others coincides with the period in U.S. history when there were no ballot access laws. One hopes that judges, legislators, and pundits will read Others, to gain an understanding of how the United States party system thrived in an atmosphere of no legal discrimination for or against any parties.

The personal accounts of so many of the featured characters will easily hold the interest of anyone who is interested in U.S. political history. Others has a 25-page index, so it is useful as a reference book. But it is fundamentally a storybook, not a book of statistics, charts or graphs.


BOOK REVIEW: THE CANDIDATEís HANDBOOK

by Harvey Yorke, revised and updated by Carl Yorke, 2003, Political Net Press. Paperback, 171 pages. $24.95.

The Candidateís Handbook is a terse, clear manual of how to run an effective election campaign. It is especially useful for anyone seeking local office. Since it was written by Californians, it tends to be somewhat more relevant to elections in that state than in other states. To order, see www.candidateshandbook.com.


JUNE (AND LATE MAY) DEMOCRATIC PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARIES

State
Kerry
Edwards
Dean
Clark
Sharpton
Lieberman
Kucinich
LaRouche
other
Ala.
164,021
--
--
--
--
--
9,076
7,254
38,223
Idaho
25,921
--
--
--
927
--
1,568
590
2,479
Montana
62,379
8,501
--
4,060
--
--
9,665
765
6,544
N. Jersey
191,816
--
--
--
--
--
9,074
4,528
2,758
So. Dak.
69,473
--
4,838
--
--
--
2,046
2,943
5,105
June Tot.
513,610
8,501
4,838
4,060
927
--
31,249
16,080
55,109
2004 Tot.
9,827,154
3,018,659
927,309
564,160
388,602
278,349
615,677
110,315
306,426

 

REPUBLICAN PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARIES: President Bush polled 187,038 in Alabama; 110,800 in Idaho; 105,999 in Montana; 211,218 in New Jersey; and 49,437 in New Mexico. His only ballot-listed opposition in June and late May primaries was "uncommitted", which received 14,449 in Alabama, 12,993 in Idaho, and 5,815 in Montana.

GREEN PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY: in New Mexico, Carol Miller received 345; David Cobb 158; Lorna Salzman 56; Paul Glover 47; Kent Mesplay 16.

The "Other" vote in Democratic presidential primaries in June was "uncommitted", except in New Jersey it was George Ballard.


2004 PETITIONING FOR PRESIDENT

STATE
REQUIREMENTS
SIGNATURES COLLECTED
DEADLINE
later method
FULL PARTY
CAND.
LIB'T
GREEN
NADER
CONSTI.
NAT LAW

Alabama

41,012

5,000

*450

*450

*2,500

*5,000

0

Sep 6

Alaska

(reg) 6,937

#2,845

already on

already on

*100

already on

0

Aug 4

Arizona

16,348

14,694

already on

0

*finished

*too late

*too late

Jun 9

Arkansas

10,000

1,000

900

*1,150

0

*300

0

Aug 2

California

(reg) 77,389

153,035

already on

already on

*1,000

already on

already on

Aug 6

Colorado

(reg) 1,000

#pay fee

already on

already on

virtual on

already on

already on

July 5

Connecticut

no procedure

#7,500

*1,000

already on

*250

*3,800

0

Aug 4

Delaware

(reg) 259

5,184

already on

already on

0

already on

already on

Aug 21

D.C.

no procedure

est. #3,600

*0

already on

*0

*0

*0

Aug 17

Florida

be organized

93,024

already on

already on

virtual on

already on

already on

Sep 1

Georgia

37,153

#37,153

already on

5,000

*2,000

0

0

July 13

Hawaii

677

3,711

already on

already on

0

50

already on

Sep 3

Idaho

10,033

5,017

already on

*5,500

*2,000

already on

already on

Aug 31

Illinois

no procedure

#25,000

*finished

*too late

*finished

*too late

*too late

Jun 21

Indiana

no procedure

#29,553

already on

500

9,000

0

0

Jul 1

Iowa

no procedure

#1,500

*950

*250

0

25

0

Aug 13

Kansas

16,714

5,000

already on

0

0

finished

0

Aug 2

Kentucky

no procedure

#5,000

*550

0

0

*2,000

0

Aug 26

Louisiana

est. (reg) 140,000

#pay fee

1,369

855

0

39

23

Sep 7

Maine

25,260

#4,000

*100

already on

0

*2,800

0

Aug 9

Maryland

10,000

27,899

finished

already on

*2,000

already on

0

Aug 2

Mass.

est. (reg) 38,000

#10,000

already on

already on

*3,000

33

1,469

July 27

Michigan

31,776

31,776

already on

already on

*4,000

already on

already on

July 15

Minnesota

112,557

#2,000

0

already on

canít start

0

0

Sep 14

Mississippi

be organized

#1,000

already on

already on

virtual on

already on

already on

Sep 3

Missouri

undetermined

10,000

already on

*4,000

0

200

0

July 26

Montana

5,000

#5,000

already on

already on

*2,200

already on

already on

July 28

Nebraska

4,810

2,500

already on

4,700

*100

0

0

Aug 24

Nevada

5,019

5,019

already on

already on

*finished

already on

already on

July 9

New Hamp.

13,260

#3,000

*150

0

*700

finished

0

Aug 11

New Jersey

no procedure

#800

*50

0

*800

*300

0

July 26

New Mexico

2,422

14,527

already on

already on

0

*already on

0

Sep 7

New York

no procedure

#15,000

can't start

can't start

can't start

can't start

can't start

Aug 17

No. Carolina

58,842

100,532

already on

*0

*10,000

*0

0

Jul 6

North Dakota

7,000

#4,000

canít start

canít start

canít start

canít start

canít start

Sep 3

Ohio

32,290

5,000

in court

*250

*200

finished

0

Aug 19

Oklahoma

51,781

37,027

in court

0

2,000

0

0

Jul 15

Oregon

18,864

15,306

already on

already on

0

already on

0

Aug 24

Penn.

no procedure

25,697

*13,000

*10,000

*4,000

*8,000

0

Aug 2

Rhode Island

16,592

#1,000

0

already on

0

0

0

Sep 3

So. Carolina

10,000

10,000

already on

already on

*2,000

already on

0

Jul 15

South Dakota

8,364

#3,346

already on

0

*50

already on

0

Aug 3

Tennessee

41,322

*275

0

0

*100

*100

0

Aug 19

Texas

45,540

64,077

finished

too late

in court

too late

too late

May 24

Utah

2,000

#1,000

already on

already on

*100

already on

0

Sep 3

Vermont

be organized

#1,000

already on

already on

0

already on

0

Sep 16

Virginia

no procedure

#10,000

*10,500

*1,200

*2,000

*100

0

Aug 20

Washington

no procedure

*#1,000

already on

*0

*0

*0

*0

Aug 25

West Va.

no procedure

#12,963

finished

0

*1,500

0

0

Aug 2

Wisconsin

10,000

#2,000

already on

already on

canít start

already on

can't start

Sep 7

Wyoming

3,644

3,644

already on

0

0

0

0

Aug 23

TOTAL STATES ON
28
23
virtual 3
*18
10
-

# allows label.
* entry change since last B.A.N.
Prohibition is on in Co.
Socialist is on in S.C., finished in N.J.
Socialist Equality is finished in N.J.
Socialist Workers started in Ms. and Ut.
American has 1,000 in Mississippi, 100 in Arkansas, and 300 in Utah.


LIBERTARIANS NOMINATE BADNARIK

On May 30, the Libertarian Party national convention nominated Michael Badnarik of Texas for president, and Richard Campagna of Iowa for vice-president.

C-SPAN broadcast the final candidate debate live on May 29, and the roll-call vote on May 30. The outcome for president was a surprise to most observers. Although Badnarik had been one of three candidates who had visited Libertarian state conventions all year (and many conventions last year as well), most Libertarians as well as others expected Gary Nolan or Aaron Russo to receive the nomination. However, Badnarik did very well in the final debate. When he placed second in each of the first two votes, third-place finish Nolan dropped out and endorsed Badnarik. See page five; for the state-by-state tallies.

Badnarik, 49, is a computer programmer and also conducts his own classes on the U.S. constitution. He had run twice before as a Libertarian candidate, each time for the Texas legislature. Neither Nolan nor Russo had ever run for office as a Libertarian, although Russo had run as a Republican for Governor of Nevada in 1998.


LIBERTARIAN VOTE FOR PRESIDENT

STATE

FIRST

VOTE

-

-

SECOND

VOTE

-

-

THIRD

VOTE

-

Russo

Badnk

Nolan

other

Russo

Badnk

Nolan

other

Badnk

Russo

Ala

11

3

2

0

8

3

3

0

3

13

Alas

6

3

1

0

5

4

1

0

5

5

Az

7

2

1

4

10

4

1

0

5

10

Ark

5

1

0

0

5

1

0

0

1

5

Cal

22

12

20

1

25

11

21

1

25

31

Colo

0

4

7

0

0

5

6

0

11

0

Ct

0

0

5

0

0

0

5

0

5

0

Del

1

2

1

0

3

0

1

0

1

3

DC

1

0

2

1

2

0

2

0

2

1

Fla

27

21

11

0

23

24

8

0

30

26

Ga

22

21

20

0

27

19

20

0

36

31

Hi

- -

- -

- -

- -

- -

- -

- -

0

- -

- -

Id

2

1

0

0

2

1

0

0

1

2

Ill

12

10

5

0

12

10

5

0

12

15

Ind

4

9

27

0

3

4

34

0

33

6

Iowa

3

8

2

1

3

10

0

1

11

3

Kan

3

1

3

0

4

1

2

0

3

3

Ky

2

0

0

0

2

0

0

0

0

2

La

2

1

5

2

4

0

5

0

4

5

Me

0

0

8

0

0

0

8

0

8

0

Md

9

8

5

1

12

7

4

1

6

16

Mass

6

2

5

1

7

2

5

0

5

7

Mich

6

9

15

0

8

5

17

0

9

20

Minn

4

7

5

0

7

7

2

0

7

9

Miss

0

0

3

0

0

0

3

0

3

0

Mo

5

9

10

0

6

9

9

0

17

7

Mont

1

0

1

0

1

1

0

0

1

1

Neb

0

0

2

0

0

0

2

0

2

0

Nev

7

0

0

0

9

0

0

0

0

9

NH

2

7

2

0

2

7

2

0

6

5

NJ

3

7

3

0

3

9

1

0

10

3

NM

6

1

0

0

6

1

0

0

1

6

NY

10

4

3

1

10

5

3

0

6

11

No C

15

18

1

0

18

17

1

0

17

18

No D

0

1

2

0

0

1

2

0

1

2

Ohio

0

0

19

2

0

0

20

1

17

3

Okla

1

3

0

0

1

3

0

0

3

1

Ore

4

5

5

0

4

5

5

0

10

4

Pa

9

14

1

2

15

11

1

0

11

15

RI

- -

- -

- -

- -

- -

- -

- -

- -

- -

- -

So C

7

6

3

0

7

6

3

0

9

7

So D

- -

- -

- -

- -

- -

- -

- -

- -

- -

- -

Tenn

5

12

4

0

5

12

3

1

14

7

Tex

3

19

7

0

3

19

7

0

23

4

Utah

2

1

1

2

4

1

1

0

1

5

Vt

0

1

0

0

0

1

0

0

1

0

Va

12

15

22

0

10

15

23

0

33

11

Wash

3

0

2

2

2

0

3

2

1

5

WV

0

1

4

0

0

1

4

0

5

0

Wis

8

6

1

0

7

6

1

0

7

7

Wyo

0

1

0

0

0

1

0

0

1

0

TOTAL

258

256

246

20

285

249

244

7

423

344

 


WORKERS WORLD NOMINATES

On May 23, the Workers World Party national committee chose John Parker of Los Angeles for president, and Teresa Gutierrez of New York city for vice-president. This is the first time since 1988 that the Workers World Party has nominated a male for president.


NADER PICKS V-P, GETS MATCHING $$

On June 21, Ralph Nader announced that his vice-presidential candidate will be Peter Camejo. Camejo, 64, of Folsom, California, was the Green Party nominee for Governor of California in 2002, when he polled 5.3%. In other news, on May 28 the Federal Election Commission announced that Nader had qualified for primary season matching funds. He received an initial check for $100,000.


SOCIALIST WORKERS NOMINATES

On June 12, at its national meeting in Oberlin, Ohio, the Socialist Workers Party nominated Roger Calero for president and Arrin Hawkins for vice-president.


INDEPENDENCE PARTY

On June 6, the New York Independence Party state convention unanimously endorsed U.S. Senator Charles Schumer for re-election. The vote guarantees that Schumer, a Democrat, will also receive the Independence Party nomination.

The irony of Schumerís uncontested nomination is that the Independence Party wonít be holding a statewide primary this year for any office. Thus, the partyís much-heralded rule change last year, permitting registered independents to vote in its primary (for statewide office only), will have no effect this year.


GREEN PARTY

C-SPAN will broadcast the Green Partyís presidential vote selection process on June 26. The party is considered likely to nominate David Cobb, nominate Ralph Nader, or make no nomination. If the party makes no national nomination, the various state parties may or may not make their own presidential choices. Approximately one-third of the delegates are pledged to Cobb; a majority of the remainder are uncommitted. The convention is in Milwaukee.

Ralph Nader will not attend the convention. He will be in Portland, Oregon, speaking to a meeting of supporters. If 1,000 registered Oregon voters attend that meeting, he will be placed on the Oregon ballot as an independent.


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