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2012 Constitution Party National Convention Set for Nashville

Published on November 18, 2010, by in General.

On November 12, the national committee of the Constitution Party chose Nashville, Tennessee, as the site for its 2012 presidential nominating convention.  The exact dates haven’t been set yet, but they will be either in late April or early May.

12 Responses

  1. Jeff Becker

    GREAT Location! Nashville is a day’s drive from much of the American population. No need to be groped by TSA perverts! I expect to see lots of gas-saving carpooling to this event.

  2. An Alabama Independent

    I wonder if the Constitution National Convention will allow “An Alabama Independent” to attend the convention?

  3. An Alabama Independent

    I wonder if the Constitution National Convention will allow “An Alabama Independent” to attend the Convention? Afterall, I support Social Security, National Health Care, Public Aid To Education, Public Financing of Elections, and nationalization of all banks with a return to the Gold Standard.

    I also oppose US membership in the United Nations, I support building and enforcing the Fence between Mexico and the USA to stop illegal immigration, and am Pro-Life and Pro-Family and believe for the continued sovereignity of this republic, we also most become energy independent.

    I’d love to attend – and even participate as a delegate from Alabama – but just want to be upfront with where I stand.

    What chance do you think I’ll be given credentials to attend as as Delegate?

  4. paulie

    AI, write jcassity at cpalabama.org and find out.

    I’m not in the CP.

    But, since you mentioned your views – I agree with you about the United Nations. The rest, not so much, although I do think that energy independence will be the natural consequence of a real free market in energy, and that a de facto gold standard is a likely result of a free market in money (end to legal tender laws and end to government-issued currency).

  5. Jeff Becker

    AI,
    Based on your positions, I’d say you’d be about as popular in the CP as Alan Keyes. You sound like you’d be more at home in the Green Party:
    http://www.gp.org/platform.shtml
    http://www.ag.auburn.edu/auxiliary/grassroots/agp/index.htm

  6. An Alabama Independent

    Paulie Says. I don’t want us to get sidetracked and at odds with our difference in political philosophies, as I am hoping you will join with me and others in working for ballot access reform in Alabama.

    However, just one question. Does it not bother you that a so-called free market energy system will mean in reality common working people will pay $10 or more for a gallon of a substitute or synthetic fuel for their cars? If the so-called free market can’t make an avarice profit, they ain’t gonna fool with it. With them, it’s “to hell with the needs of the people, if we can’t make a profit.”

    The same is true with a so-called free market money system. One major mistake our Founding Fathers made in writing the Constitution, was in not listing the “establishing of a national bank” in the list of “Powers Granted to Congress”in Section VIII. Why they did not add that to the power to “coin money” confounds me. The private banking system we have today – even with the so-called “stabilization of a flexible currency” that was to be provided by the Federal Reserve System, still sucks the lifeblood out of the average American. There is absolutely no justification for a bank to loan me $100,000 to buy a home, but when I’ve paid for it 30 years from now, I’ll have paid over $200,000. That is nothing less than greed at its worse. All interest rates by law should be fixed at simple interest. I just wish more and more people would come to realize such.

  7. paulie

    AI

    Does it not bother you that a so-called free market energy system will mean in reality common working people will pay $10 or more for a gallon of a substitute or synthetic fuel for their cars?

    It wouldn’t even cost 10 cents (or equivalent earning power). No time to go into details, as I’m packing bags and won’t have any internet after this.

    No time to go into your errors on economic issues; on the general subject of money and banking I highly recommend you read this -

    http://mises.org/money.asp

    Click on each of the chapters to read it in full.

    Mr. Becker -

    I think you are a bit off the mark in saying AI would be at home in the Green Party. The stated views on immigration and abortion (I’m not sure what “pro-family” means to AI, but that might be a fit as well) sounds a lot like your party. I don’t think they would fit in well with the Greens. The economic views might, though. That would be a serious barrier between AI and y’all.

    One of the few things all three of us probably agree on is getting out of the UN.

    Back to AI -

    One thing that I will work with anyone on regardless of their other views is ballot access reform.

    No need to worry on that score.

    Unfortunately, my internet access will be much more limited starting tomorrow morning.

  8. Matt

    Alabama Independent,

    You do not need permission from someone else to participate in a political party. If you find that the Constitution Party matches your views better than any other party, contact your local state party organization and get involved.

    If you have differences on issues, you can try to convince others of your views. If you do not convince them, you need to just accept it and work for the candidates based on on the issues you do agree on.

    Jeff, you are showing a lack of understanding of political parties. Very rarely are members going to agree on 100% of issues. You need to take help and voters where you can get them and hope to convince them later. Remember, most Americans don’t agree with 100% of your platform, so you will never win an election if you can’t handle disagreement.

  9. gary odom

    Without getting into the subjective matters here, the state parties each have authority over the selection of their respective delegations and they would then of course determine the rules for whatever selection process they use. One thing that will be a stumbling block for this fellow is that all delegates must reveal their actual name to be a participant and he(?) doesn’t seem to want to do that.

    Let me say, (ahem), that I expect both Alambama and West Virginia–two states who were absent from the National Convention in 2008, to field full delegations in 2012 in Nashville.

  10. An Alabama Independent

    To Paulie Says. I’m familiar with this “Ludwig von Mises” crap. When all is said and done, it supports an economic system which allows the rich to get richer and the poor to keep struggling. Since the beginning of time, greedy men have desired to exploit their fellow man, and the economics of Ludwig von Mises is just a fancy and respectable way to do it.

    It’s good to know you don’t allow differences in philosphies to stop from helping others with ballot access reform. I’m the same way. 2011 is going to be one of the strongest efforts in years to make the ballot more obtainable in Alabama. We need all the help we can get.

    But am disappointed you will not be as available online in the future. But I do have the other contact information you gave me. I look forward to working with you.

  11. Michael

    Just wondering. Why select Nashville? The mid-South has never been a CP powerhouse in vote totals?

  12. Florida Conservative

    Probably to get more votes in the south.

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