Home General U.S. Supreme Court Asks Illinois to Respond in Senator Burris' Lawsuit Over How Candidates Get on Ballot in Special Election
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U.S. Supreme Court Asks Illinois to Respond in Senator Burris' Lawsuit Over How Candidates Get on Ballot in Special Election

Published on November 26, 2010, by in General.

On November 3, the U.S. Supreme Court asked the state of Illinois to respond to the lawsuit filed by U.S. Senator Roland Burris.  The case is Judge v Quinn, 10-367.  The issue was how candidates could qualify to get on the ballot in the special election for U.S. Senate, two-month term, that was held on November 2, 2010.

The lower courts had ordered that Illinois simply print on the ballot the names of people who had qualified in the U.S. Senate race for the full term, on the ballot as the candidates for the short term.  U.S. Senator Roland Burris was not running for the full term, but he wanted to run for the short term.  But the lower courts left him no possibility of qualifying to run for the short term.

Illinois’ response is due December 3, 2010.  If the U.S. Supreme Court does hear this case, it would have no effect on this particular Illinois Senate election, but it would set rules for future special elections.

2 Responses

  1. Demo Rep

    The SCOTUS MORONS do not like to STOP elections before election days and/or order NEW elections — to have a bit of chaos.

    BUT – they love to order reforms in FUTURE elections – to conform with the nearly dead U.S.A. Constitution.

    Result — election LAW has been more than a bit INSANE and UNEQUAL since 1962 — Baker v. Carr — and ballot access since 1968.

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