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December 2012 Ballot Access News Print Edition

Published on January 4, 2013, by in General.

Ballot Access News
December 1, 2012 – Volume 28, Number 7


This issue was printed on white paper.



Table of Contents

  1. ARIZONA VOTERS DEFEAT TOP-TWO BY MARGIN OF 2:1
  2. SUPREME COURT NEWS
  3. BOOK REVIEW: THE CRUSADER
  4. OCTOBER 2012 REGISTRATION TOTALS
  5. 2012 PRESIDENTIAL VOTE
  6. PRESIDENTIAL VOTES FOR PARTIES NOT ON CHART
  7. 2014 PETITIONING FOR STATEWIDE OFFICE
  8. PRIMARY SEASON MATCHING $
  9. MORE “OTHER” LEGISLATORS ELECTED IN 2012 THAN ANY YEAR SINCE 1942
  10. MINOR PARTY DEBATES
  11. SUBSCRIBING TO BAN WITH PAYPAL

ARIZONA VOTERS DEFEAT TOP-TWO BY MARGIN OF 2:1

AUTHORS OF TOP-TWO LOSE IN CALIFORNIA AND WASHINGTON

On November 6, Arizona voters defeated Proposition 121 by 1,340,286 to 662,366. Proposition 121 was an initiative to change elections to a top-two system, similar to those used in Washington state and California.

One reason the measure lost is that it was described clearly on the ballot: "Proposition 121 Relating to Direct Primary Law. A ‘yes’ vote shall have the effect of replacing the current party primary election with a ‘top-two’ primary election in which all voters, regardless of party affiliation, vote in a single, combined primary, and the top two vote-getters for each seat advance to the general election ballot. This ‘top-two’ primary will not apply to the election of the U.S. President or to elections in which no party affiliation appears on the ballot."

By contrast, when California voters passed a top-two measure by 53.73% in June 2010, the ballot said, "Proposition 14. Elections. Increases Right to Participate in Primary Elections. Changes the primary process for congressional, statewide and legislative races. Allows all voters to choose any candidate regardless of the candidate’s or voter’s political party preference."

Mark Rogalski, an Arizona activist, took the lead in getting the measure described accurately on the ballot. He persuaded the Secretary of State to revise the language so that it included the term "top-two."

Supporters of the initiative said they lost because opponents received a big contribution for advertising. The contribution was from Americans for Responsive Leadership. It contributed $450,000 on October 15, and another $150,000 at the end of October. The money paid for direct mail and TV ads against Prop. 121.

The direct mail piece said, "Prop. 121 would completely eliminate Arizona’s open primary elections. If Prop. 121 passed, big special interest money will control our elections." Also, "You May Not Have a Choice of Political Party in the general elections. Prop. 121 could result in general elections between two candidates from the same political party. Two Democrats only. Or two Republicans only. No other parties to choose from. No choice between a Republican, a Democrat, an Independent, or other political parties."

The TV spot showed a picture of a ballot with a fairly lengthy list of candidates, but then most of them vanished. The narrator stressed that the measure would shrink voter choice in the general election.

The Goldwater Institute held a forum for opponents of the measure, which publicized the fact that the Democratic, Republican, Libertarian, and Green Parties opposed the measure. Christina Tobin of Free & Equal toured the state and spoke against Proposition 121 in five cities. The League of Women Voters opposed the measure.

Proponents also used direct mail, which carried the message that the initiative would weaken the control of political parties and cause more moderate legislators to be elected.

Although proponents complained about the spending against the measure, they raised $1.343,540, most of it raised from business interests, including $50,000 from Rob Walton, head of Walmart.

The League of Women Voters will now ask the proponents to work with them to persuade the legislature to ease ballot access for independent candidates.

California

On November 6, Abel Maldonado, the Republican candidate for U.S. House, 24th district, lost to Lois Capps, the Democratic incumbent, 55%-45%. Ironically, this was the only election Maldonado has ever lost in his part of California, the central coast. And, it is the only top-two election he has ever been in.

Maldonado won partisan elections in the blanket primary years of 1998 and 2000, and the semi-closed primary years of 2002, 2004, and 2008. Although he has lost two statewide elections (in 2006 for Controller and in 2010 for Lieutenant Governor), he always carried San Luis Obispo and Santa Barbara Counties in those statewide primaries and elections.

This is all very ironic, because Maldonado is the man who forced the California legislature in 2009 to put the top-two measure on the ballot, and he campaigned vigorously for it. However, chances are, the 2012 congressional race would have turned out the same even if it had been conducted with a semi-closed primary.

More importantly, the California 2012 top-two experience did not perform as its supporters had predicted. The California large newspapers and business interests promoted Proposition 14 as a way to reduce the number of Republicans in the legislature who refused to be flexible on raising taxes. But only one state legislative race in 2012 appears to have worked that way. In the 5th Assembly race, an anti-tax former state legislator, Rico Oller, lost to another Republican who said he would consider raising taxes. Probably Oller would have won under California’s former semi-closed primary system.

Offsetting that success (from the point of view of the proponents), Proposition 14 had the unfortunate result of cheating the Democratic majority in the U.S. House race, 31st district, from a chance to elect a Democrat. Only two conservative Republicans were on the November ballot, and there was no write-in space. The district voted heavily for President Obama and U.S. Senator Dianne Feinstein, and Democrats far outnumber Republicans in the district. Every observer agrees that if a Democrat had been on the November ballot, he or she would have won.

No Democrat was on the ballot in the 31st district because four strong Democrats split the primary vote, whereas only two Republicans ran in June, so Republicans narrowly won both the first and second place spots in the primary.

Some backers of Proposition 14 argued that a top-two system would help independent candidates, but no independent candidates were elected, even though a few of them had as much campaign funding as their major party opponents.

By contrast, 17 independent candidates and 8 minor party candidates were elected to state legislatures last month, all in states that don’t use top-two systems. Also two independent U.S. Senators were elected or re-elected, also in states that don’t use top-two.

Washington

On November 6, Rob McKenna, Republican candidate for Governor, lost to Democratic candidate Jay Inslee by 1,575,909 to 1,483,176 (these figu
res are not final). McKenna had been the champion of the top-two system in his state. As Attorney General, he personally argued in defense of the top-two system in the U.S. Supreme Court in 2007, and he won the case, although the 2008 decision only says the system doesn’t violate freedom of association on its face, and the decision also says in footnote eleven that the ballot access issue is still open.

Furthermore, when the case returned to the U.S. Supreme Court this year, McKenna used his clout with the state Republican Party to keep the Republican Party from participating in the new appeal. That was probably the reason the U.S. Supreme Court refused to hear the new appeal, on October 1, 2012. The Republican Party wanted to be in the appeal, but McKenna was the party’s presumptive gubernatorial nominee and he used his influence to block the party from appealing.

In other results in Washington state in the 2012 election, the top-two system maintained its characteristic of helping incumbents to be re-elected. 2012 was the third election in a row at which Washington used the top-two system. In all three elections, no incumbent member of Congress has been defeated for re-election.


SUPREME COURT NEWS

On November 9, the U.S. Supreme Court said it will hear Shelby County, Alabama v Holder, 12-96. The issue is whether the federal Voting Rights Act, section 5, is unconstitutional. This part of the Act has been upheld by the Court several times in the past. Section 5 requires certain states, and parts of certain other states, to get permission from the U.S. Department of Justice before altering any election laws or practices. The lower court had upheld the act.

That makes two election law cases that the Court has accepted this term. The other one is Arizona v Inter Tribal Council of Arizona, 12-71, over whether the state may add extra questions to the federal voter registration form.

The Court will probably decide in January 2013 whether to hear Daneilczyk v U.S., 12-579, over whether corporations have a right to make donations (up to the contribution limit) to candidates for federal office. As is well known, in 2010 the court ruled that corporations may make independent expenditures.


BOOK REVIEW: THE CRUSADER

The Crusader: The Life and Tumultuous Times of Pat Buchanan, by Timothy Stanley, 455 pages, 2012.

The author is a historian at Oxford University who specializes in U.S. history. His biography of Pat Buchanan includes three chapters on Buchanan’s experience winning the Reform Party presidential nomination in 2000, and running as its nominee. There are so few books about the Reform Party, especially its history after 1996, that this book is valuable. Also, the author is a talented writer, and the book is so interesting it is hard to put it down.

Unfortunately, the book’s chapters on the Reform Party are not well researched. For those chapters, the author depended on his extensive interviews with Pat and Bay Buchanan, plus articles in the New York Times and the Washington Post. He did not interview leaders of the Reform Party nor of the Natural Law Party. One chapter is "Pat Buchanan vs. the Flying Buddhists." This is a reference to Buchanan’s struggle with John Hagelin, leader of the Natural Law Party, for the nomination of the Reform Party. "Flying Buddhists" is inaccurate as a nickname for the Transcendental Movement created by Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, founder of the world’s Natural Law Parties. It is true that the TM movement practiced yogic flying but to the extent TM has religious roots, they are Hindu, not Buddhist.

Also the author didn’t understand the process by which candidates for the Reform nomination were supposed to qualify. He says candidates were obliged to get signatures from all 50 states, and then the people who signed those ballot access petitions would automatically receive a mail ballot to let them help choose the Reform Party nominee. Actually, the Reform Party was already on the ballot in 1999 in 21 states, and the candidates were expected to collect signatures only in the other 29 states, not all 50 states.


OCTOBER 2012 REGISTRATION TOTALS
(updated 1/1/13)

~

Dem.

Rep.

Indp, misc

Lib’t.

Green

Consti.

Reform

Am. Elect

other

Alaska

73,468

137,666

268,797

7,719

2,007

80

?

?

16,964

Arizona

952,931

1,120,992

1,023,603

22,086

4,863

?

?

237

- -

Calif.

7,966,422

5,356,608

4,138,251

108,736

115,034

260

17,937

3,313

539,409

Colorado

887,470

925,785

900,490

19,585

7,197

5,702

?

3,017

- -

Conn.

767,693

430,439

873,337

1,603

1,815

182

87

?

14,155

Delaware

300,332

181,717

144,198

908

634

414

105

?

3,953

Dt. Col.

354,658

30,483

81,595

?

4,225

?

?

?

- -

Florida

4,781,978

4,245,991

2,572,901

19,892

5,705

974

1,961

103

304,941

Idaho

36,220

196,271

550,189

1,312

?

548

?

?

- -

Iowa

628,043

629,443

694,558

2,203

875

0

0

0

- -

Kansas

446,237

790,345

522,096

11,373

0

0

978

223

0

Kentucky

1,665,853

1,151,331

216,333

2,615

637

226

92

?

66

Louis’na

1,429,073

815,769

707,159

6,889

1,707

118

1,441

764

79

Maine

297,445

258,463

337,535

?

32,315

?

?

58

- -

Maryland

2,059,544

959,858

655,000

11,256

8,716

?

?

153

- -

Mass.

1,551,693

484,099

2,286,646

13,336

6,507

102

205

?

253

Nebraska

374,191

558,170

228,563

3,117

?

?

?

125

- -

Nevada

526,986

436,799

226,072

8,448

1,186

58,130

?

?

- -

N. Hamp.

224,915

258,714

307,805

?

?

?

?

?

- -

N. Jersey

1,787,480

1,084,757

2,621,197

1,899

1,203

164

71

?

551

N. Mex.

596,209

395,992

249,350

3,541

6,953

143

3

1

2,081

N. York

5,913,035

2,873,360

2,480,766

3,874

22,955

?

?

?

675,202

No. Car.

2,871,249

2,052,608

1,707,318

19,347

?

?

?

?

- -

Okla.

965,073

895,771

254,225

?

?

?

?

18

- -

Oregon

878,460

688,504

521,595

15,434

11,143

3,401

?

82

100,738

Pennsyl.

3,877,434

2,890,368

968,009

36,353

12,599

3,814

?

?

- -

Rhode Is.

299,037

77,177

355,511

?

?

?

?

106

1,090

So. Dak.

189,493

243,113

94,536

1,126

?

349

?

4

- -

Utah

120,929

614,730

556,911

5,572

1,089

3,221

?

15

34

W. Va.

638,086

353,179

236,555

1,448

1,317

?

?

?

- -

Wyo.

51,109

160,361

27,709

1,139

="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">?

90

?

9

21

TOTAL

43,512,746

31,298,863

26,808,810

330,811

250,682

77,918

22,880

6,408

1,659,537

Percent

41.85%

30.10%

25.79%

.32%

.24%

.07%

.02%

.01%

1.60%

All figures are from October and November 2012, except the Connecticut minor party numbers are as of February 2012.

Totals October 2010 were: Dem. 43,140,758 (42.98%), Rep. 30,700,138 (30.58%), Indp. & misc. 24,359,097 (24.27%), AIP/Constitution 476,669 (.47%), Libertarian 278,446 (.28%), Green 246,145 (.25%), Working Families 44,867 (.04%), Reform 30,237 (.03%), other parties 1,107,843 (1.10%).

Totals October 2008 were: Dem. 43,933,901 (43.62%), Rep. 30,944,590 (30.72%), Indp. & misc. 24,157,259 (23.98%), AIP/Constitution 438,222 (.44%), Green 255,019 (.25%), Libertarian 240,328 (.24%), Reform 32,961 (.03%), other parties 675,980 (.67%).

Totals October 2004 were: Dem. 37,301,951 (42.19%), Rep. 28,988,593 (32.79%), Indp. & misc. 20,471,250 (23.15%), Constitution 320,019 (.36%), Green 298,701 (.34%), Libertarian 235,521 (.27%), Reform 63,729 (.07%), Natural Law 39,670 (.04%), other parties 695,639 (.79%).

Totals October 2000 were: Dem. 38,529,264 (43.84%), Rep. 28,813,511 (32.78%), Indp. & misc. 18,999,126 (21.62%), Constitution 348,977 (.40%), Libertarian 224,713 (.26%), Green 193,332 (.22%), Reform 99,408 (.11%), Natural Law 61,405 (.07%), other parties 620,668 (.71%).

Totals October 1992 were: Dem. 35,616,630 (47.76%), Rep. 24,590,383 (32.97%), Indp. & misc. 13,617,167 (18.26%), Green 102,557 (.14%), Libertarian 100,394 (.13%), other parties 554,668 (.74%).


2012 PRESIDENTIAL VOTE
(updated 1/1/13)

~

Obama

Romney

Johnson

Stein

Goode

Barr

Anderson

Hoefling

P.S.L

Alabama

795,696

1,254,925

12,328

3,397

2,981

5

8

?

?

Alaska

122,640

164,676

7,392

2,917

?

?

?

?

?

Arizona

lign="RIGHT">1,025,232

1,233,654

32,100

7,816

289

?

119

?

?

Arkansas

394,409

647,744

16,276

9,305

0

0

0

0

0

Calif.

7,854,285

4,839,958

143,221

85,638

503

53,824

992

38,372

1,734

Colorado

1,322,998

1,185,050

35,540

7,508

6,233

5,055

1,262

679

316

Conn.

905,083

634,892

12,340

863

?

?

4,971

?

?

Del.

242,584

165,484

3,882

1,940

23

?

?

?

?

D.C.

267,070

21,381

2,083

2,458

?

?

?

?

?

Florida

4,237,756

4,163,447

44,726

8,947

2,607

8,154

1,754

946

322

Georgia

1,773,827

2,078,688

45,324

1,516

432

?

154

?

?

Hawaii

306,658

121,015

3,840

3,184

0

0

0

0

0

Idaho

212,787

420,911

9,453

4,402

2,222

?

2,499

?

?

Illinois

3,019,512

2,135,216

56,229

30,222

415

?

185

?

?

Indiana

1,152,887

1,420,543

50,111

625

290

?

?

35

?

Iowa

822,544

730,617

12,926

3,769

3,038

?

?

?

371

Kansas

440,726

692,634

20,456

714

187

58

95

?

?

Kentucky

679,370

1,087,190

17,063

6,337

245

?

60

?

?

Louisiana

809,141

1,152,262

18,157

6,978

2,508

0

1,368

?

622

Maine

401,306

292,276

9,352

8,119

?

?

62

?

?

Maryland

1,677,844

971,869

30,195

17,110

418

64

204

?

?

Mass.

1,921,290

1,188,314

30,920

20,691

?

?

?

?

?

Michigan

2,564,569

2,115,256

7,774

21,897

16,119

?

5,147

42

?

Minn.

1,546,167

1,320,225

35,098

13,023

3,722

46

1,996

? ont>

397

Miss.

562,949

710,746

6,676

1,588

2,609

?

?

?

?

Missouri

1,223,796

1,482,440

43,151

?

7,936

?

?

?

?

Montana

201,839

267,928

14,165

?

39

6

59

5

?

Nebraska

302,081

475,064

11,109

?

?

?

?

?

?

Nevada

531,373

463,567

10,968

0

3,240

0

0

0

0

N. Hamp.

369,561

329,918

8,212

324

708

?

?

?

?

N. Jersey

2,122,786

1,478,088

21,035

9,886

2,063

?

1,723

?

445

N. Mex.

415,335

335,788

27,788

2,691

982

0

1,174

0

0

N. York

4,471,871

2,485,432

47,092

37,826

6,270

?

212

34

2,039

No. Car.

2,178,391

2,270,395

44,515

?

534

?

?

?

?

No. Dak.

124,966

188,320

5,238

1,362

1,186

?

?

?

?

Ohio

2,827,621

2,661,407

49,493

18,574

8,151

?

?

?

?

Okla.

443,547

891,325

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Oregon

970,488

754,175

24,089

19,427

?

?

3,384

?

?

Penn.

2,990,274

2,680,434

49,991

nt size="2" face="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">21,341

?

?

?

?

?

R.I.

279,677

157,204

4,388

2,421

430

?

416

?

132

S.Car.

865,941

1,071,645

16,321

5,446

4,765

0

0

0

0

S.Dak.

145,039

210,610

5,795

0

2,371

0

0

0

0

Tenn.

960,709

1,462,330

18,623

6,515

6,022

?

2,639

?

?

Texas

3,308,124

4,569,843

88,580

24,657

1,287

?

426

?

?

Utah

251,813

740,600

12,572

3,817

2,871

18

5,335

?

393

Vermont

199,239

92,698

3,487

?

?

?

1,128

?

695

Virginia

1,971,820

1,822,522

31,216

8,627

13,058

?

76

?

?

Wash.

1,755,396

1,290,670

42,202

20,928

8,851

?

4,946

?

1,318

W.Va.

238,269

417,655

6,302

4,406

119

31

12

?

?

Wisc.

1,620,985

1,410,966

20,439

7,665

4,930

88

112

?

516

Wyoming

69,286

170,962

5,326

?

1,452

?

?

?

?

TOTAL

65,899,557

60,931,959

1,275,559

466,877

122,106

67,349

42,518

40,113

9,300


PRESIDENTIAL VOTES FOR PARTIES NOT ON CHART
(updated 1/1/13)

Reform: had three different presidential candidates, each on the ballot in one state. Chuck Baldwin received 5,017 in Kansas; Andre Barnett received 820 in Florida plus these write-ins: Alabama 1, Maryland 19, Minnesota 4, Montana 2, Texas 87, Utah 5, total 938; Barbara Washer received 1,016 in Mississippi.

Objectivist: 235 in Colorado, 3,856 in Florida, total 4,302.

Socialist: 308 in Colorado, 799 in Florida, 2,967 in Ohio, plus these write-ins: Alabama 2, California 82, Indiana 17, Michigan 89, Montana 4, Texas 162, total 4,430.

Socialist Workers: 192 in Colorado, 445 in Iowa, 389 in Louisiana, 1,051 in Minnesota, 709 in New Jersey, 1,205 in Washington, plus these write-ins: Alabama 1, California 72, Connecticut 5, Georgia 21, New York 26, total 4,116.

Grassroots: 3,149 in Minnesota.

American Third Position: 268 in Colorado
, 664 in New Jersey, 1,739 in Tennessee, plus these write-ins: Alabama 1, Maryland 26, New York 6, West Virginia 11, total 2,715.

We the People: 791 in Colorado, 1,767 in Louisiana, plus these write-ins: Arizona 6, California 6, Virginia 1, total 2,571.

Twelve Visions: 2,588 in Colorado, plus these write-ins: Alabama 1, Arizona 17, Delaware 1, Florida 36, Georgia 30, Illinois 131, Indiana 8, Kansas 4, Maine 30, Maryland 7, Minnesota 8, New York 12, Ohio 23, Utah 6, Virginia 14, total 2,916.

Socialist Equality: 189 in Colorado, 355 in Louisiana, 553 in Wisconsin, plus these write-ins: California 79, Illinois 12, Kentucky 4, Michigan 68, New York 19, total 1,279.

Constitutional Government: 1,092 in Minnesota, plus one write-in in Maryland, total 1,093.

NSA Did 911: 1,024 in New Jersey.

Prohibition: 518 in Louisiana.

Candidates on the ballot as "independent" are Randall Terry, who got 6,872 in Kentucky, 2,408 in Nebraska, and 3,806 in West Virginia, plus these write-ins: Colorado 4, Ohio 14, total 13,104. Also Richard Duncan in Ohio, 12,502, plus these write-ins: Florida 3, Kentucky 37, West Virginia, total 12,543. Also Jerry Litrzel, Iowa, 1,027.

The Constitution Party of Oregon placed Will Christensen on the ballot, and he got 4,432 in that state, plus these write-ins: Arizona 14, Kansas 1, Minnesota 1, Utah 5, total 4,453.

The Freedom Socialist presidential candidate, Stephen Durham, wasn’t on the ballot anywhere, but he got these write-ins: California 54, Connecticut 1, Florida 3, Indiana 1, Kentucky 2, Maryland 19, New York 34, Utah 1, total 115.


2014 PETITIONING FOR STATEWIDE OFFICE
(updated 1/1/13)

STATE
REQUIREMENTS
SIGNATURES COLLECTED
DEADLINES
FULL PARTY
CAND
LIB’T
GREEN
CONSTI
JUSTICE
Party
Indp.

Ala.

44,829

44,829

in court

in court

in court

0

in court

in court

Alaska

(reg) 8,925

#2,975

already on

2,007

*80

0

June 1

Aug. 26

Ariz.

23,041

(est) #31,000

already on

(reg) 4,863

0

already on

Feb. 28

May 28

Ark.

10,000

10,000

0

0

0

0

April 12

May 1

Calif.

(reg) 103,004

65 + fee

already on

already on

260

already on

unsettled

March 7

Colo.

(reg) 1,000

#1,000

already on

already on

already on

already on

Jan. 8

July 10

Conn.

no procedure

#7,500

can’t start

already on

0

can’t start

- – -

Aug. 13

Del.

(est.) (reg) 650

(est.) 6,500

already on

already on

*414

unknown

Aug. 19

July 15

D.C.

no procedure

(est.) #3,900

already on

already on

can’t start

can’t start

- – -

Aug. 6

Florida

0

pay fee

already on

already on

already on

already on

Sep. 1

July 15

Georgia

50,334

#50,334

already on

can’t start

can’t start

0

July 8

July 8

Hawaii

706

25

0

already on

0

0

Feb. 20

June 10

Idaho

13,102

1,000

align="TOP">

already on

0

already on

0

Aug. 30

March 14

Illinois

no procedure

#25,000

can’t start

can’t start

can’t start

can’t start

- – -

June 23

Indiana

no procedure

#34,195

already on

0

0

0

- – -

June 30

Iowa

no procedure

#1,500

0

0

0

0

- – -

Aug. 15

Kansas

16,776

5,000

already on

0

0

already on

June 2

Aug. 4

Ky.

no procedure

#5,000

can’t start

can’t start

can’t start

can’t start

- – -

Aug. 12

La.

(reg) 1,000

#pay fee

already on

already on

118

764

May 15

Aug. 15

Maine

28,639

#4,000

0

already on

0

0

Dec 12, 11

June 2

Md.

10,000

ign="RIGHT"> (est.) 40,000

already on

already on

0

already on

Aug. 4

Aug. 4

Mass.

(est) (reg) 43,000

#10,000

13,336

6,507

102

0

Nov. 5, 11

July 29

Mich.

32,261

30,000

already on

already on

already on

0

July 16

July 16

Minn.

146,297

#2,000

0

0

0

0

May 1

June 17

Miss.

be organized

1,000

already on

already on

already on

already on

April 4

April 4

Mo.

10,000

10,000

already on

0

already on

0

July 28

July 28

Mont.

5,000

#11,823

already on

0

0

0

March 13

unsettled

Nebr.

4,880

4,000

already on

0

0

0

Aug. 1

Aug. 25

Nev.

9,738

9,738

already on

0

already on

0

April 11

Feb. 7

N. Hamp.

20,779

#3,000

0

0

0

0

Aug. 6

Aug. 6

N.J.

no procedure

#800

0

0

0

0

- – -

June 3

N. M.

3,009

18,053

already on

already on

already on

already on

in court

June 24

N.Y.

no procedure

#15,000

can’t start

already on

can’t start

can’t start

- – -

Aug. 19

No. Car.

89,366

89,366

already on

0

0

0

in court

June 12

No. Dak.

7,000

1,000

0

0

0

0

Apr. 11

Sep. 5

Ohio

show support

5,000

already on

already on

already on

ambiguous

unsettled

May 5

Okla.

n="RIGHT">66,744

pay fee

in court

in court

0

0

in court

April 11

Oregon

17,700

18,279

already on

already on

already on

82

Aug. 26

Aug. 26

Penn.

no procedure

(est.) 25,000

can’t start

can’t start

can’t start

can’t start

- – -

Aug. 1

R.I.

17,115

#1,000

0

0

0

0

June 2

July 17

So. Car.

10,000

10,000

already on

already on

already on

already on

May 4

July 15

So. Dak.

7,928

3,171

already on

0

already on

already on

Mar. 25

June 3

Tenn.

40,042

25

0

0

0

0

Aug. 6

April 3

Texas

49,729

49,729

already on

already on

can’t start

can’t start

May 20

April 27

ont size="2" face="Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Utah

2,000

#1,000

already on

0

already on

0

March 1

March 17

Vermont

be organized

#500

already on

0

0

already on

Jan. 1

in court

Virginia

no procedure

#10,000

can’t start

can’t start

can’t start

can’t start

- – -

June 10

Wash.

no procedure

#pay fee

can’t start

can’t start

can’t start

can’t start

- – -

May 17

West Va.

no procedure

#6,516

already on

already on

0

0

- – -

Aug. 1

Wisc.

10,000

#2,000

already on

0

already on

already on

May 1

June 3

Wyo.

4,833

4,833

already on

0

already on

0

June 1

Aug. 25

TOTAL STATES ON
31
20
15
12
`

#
partisan label permitted (other than "independent").
"AMER ELE" = Americans Elect Party.


PRIMARY SEASON MATCHING $

During 2012, only three presidential candidates received primary season matching funds. Ironically, all three were (for a time) minor party candidates. Buddy Roemer received $351,961; Jill Stein $333,331; Gary Johnson $510,261.


MORE "OTHER" LEGISLATORS ELECTED IN 2012 THAN ANY YEAR SINCE 1942

In November 2012, 17 independent state legislators, and 8 minor party nominees, were elected to state legislatures. This is the greatest number of such legislators since 1942. The eight minor party legislators include 7 Progressives in Vermont, and one Green in Arkansas.

As far as is known, the only other partisan victories won by minor parties are two Green Party victories in Arkansas, one Green Party victory in Colorado, and one Libertarian Party victory in Arkansas. The offices for the Greens in Arkansas are Craighead County Clerk and Justice of the Peace, district 6, Mississippi County. The Colorado Green Party race was County Commissioner in San Miguel County. The Arkansas Libertarian race was for Constable, DeKalb Township, Grant County.

The next B.A.N. will list non-partisan offices won by minor party candidates on November 6, 2012.


MINOR PARTY DEBATES

During October and November, there were three presidential debates involving minor party nominees. On October 24, Free & Equal sponsored a debate in Chicago. Participants were Rocky Anderson, Virgil Goode, Gary Johnson, and Jill Stein. The same four particpants debated again in Washington, D.C., on November 4, sponsored by Ralph Nader. Johnson and Stein debated each other again on November 5, also in Washington, D.C., in another Free & Equal debate.


SUBSCRIBING TO BAN WITH PAYPAL

If you use Paypal, you can subscribe to B.A.N., or renew, with Paypal. If you use a credit card in connection with Paypal, use richardwinger@yahoo.com. If you don’t use a credit card in conjunction with Paypal, use sub@richardwinger.com.

Ballot Access News is published by and copyright by Richard Winger. Note: subscriptions are available!


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Copyright © 2012 Ballot Access News

3 Responses

  1. Evan

    I know that the WV write-in totals were released a while ago, but they were just the presidential ones as displayed here. Do you have any idea to when the write-in results for offices like attorney general, governor, or senator in WV will be released? Fantastic newsletter by the way.

  2. I don’t know. You could try phoning the Sec of State: 304-558-6000.

  3. Evan

    @2 alright thanks I will in a few days

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