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Only 6% of Registered Voters Participate in Texas Special State Senate Election

Published on January 26, 2013, by in General.

On Saturday, January 26, Texas held a special State Senate election, 6th district, in Houston. Here are the election returns, from the Secretary of State’s web page. Parties did not have nominees, but party labels appeared on the ballot. Although not all provisional and absentee ballots have been counted, all precincts have reported, and it appears only 6% of the registered voters participated. The district has 284,000 registered voters.

15 Responses

  1. Be Rational

    There are too many elections, too many campaigns and too many offices to be chosen by voters in America. As a result, the voters are burned out by the process.

    Voters want to participate in the November elections, once every two years for important offices – and that’s enough.

    It is this reality that the “top-two” cabal is trying to exploit – by holding a single-party primary and building a one-party state-controlled election system.

    Under “top-two” the early single-party primary will be largely ignored and easily controlled by the government-party bosses. Then with only two candidates allowed in the general election – both chosen by the single-party bosses, or even one candidate if they can arrange it with further restrictions – the voters will have their pretend election, unaware that the whole event is a preplanned charade.

  2. Demo Rep

    Obvious remedy -
    Candidate/Incumbent rank order list of replacements.
    Legislative body to fill vacancy if no list person qualified.

    P.R. and nonpartisan App.V.

  3. Well, so long as the Republican won, what does it matter?

    The Democrats = the Evil Party

  4. Jim Riley

    #2 When would this list be made out?

  5. Andy

    It seems to me that these special elections that get low voter turn out would be a good opportunity for a well organized Libertarian Party or some other minor party or independent candidate to get elected.

  6. Jim Riley

    #5 One of the candidates, Susan Delgado, was the Libertarian nominee for the seat in 2008. She had filed for the Libertarian nomination in 2012, but the party declined to nominate her. This special election she ran as a Democrat and finished 8th.

    The Green candidate in this race finished 7th, and the independent 6th. All these candidates did better on election day than in early voting – so in some sense they were variant spellings of None of The Above for voters who were performing their civic duty, but really didn’t know who to vote for. This pattern was also true for the two Republican candidates.

    So the challenge would be to do an exceptionally good job of identifying the True Believers and getting 100% of them to vote, and getting them to convince a friend to vote for the candidate as well; or to run a high-intensity media campaign with a personable candidate who doesn’t seem like a politician (eg Jesse Ventura when he ran for governor in Minnesota).

  7. johnO

    D wins Yawn. However, good to have many other choices so people cannot complain too much.

  8. Demo Rep

    # 4 – Const. Amdt language

    Sec. ZZZ. (1) A legislative body candidate or member may file a written rank order list of persons to fill his/her vacancy, if any.
    (2) The qualified person who is highest on the list shall fill the vacancy.
    (3) If the preceding does not happen, then the legislative body shall fill the vacancy with a person of the same party (if any) immediately at its next meeting.
    —-
    This stuff ain’t atomic physics.

    Too many ANTI-Democracy devil monsters trying to get monarchs/oligarchs into total control.
    See 7 Dec 1941.
    See 11 Sep 2001 — aka 911.

    i.e. now quite possible for a surprise mass attack on a major legislative body.

  9. Jim Riley

    #8 Would these lists appear on the ballot? Would they be secret? Would they be made when they filed?

  10. Demo Rep

    # 9 Would be standard FOIA stuff.

    Constitutions are for life or death BASIC stuff.

    Who elects who, terms, separation of powers, filling top office vacancies, etc. — and NOT too much mere law type details.

    P.R. and nonpartisan App.V.

  11. Jim Riley

    The Texas Constitution, Article III, Section 13 says that vacancies in the legislature shall be filled by special election. I don’t think your idea is constitutional.

    Are you thinking along the lines of Article XVI, 72(c)?

  12. Demo Rep

    # 11 I make general comments.

    ALL sorts of EVIL insane lunatic stuff about elections in the U.S.A. and State constitutions at the moment — gerrymanders, filling vacancies, etc.
    ——–
    P.R. and nonpartisan App.V.

  13. Casual Bystander

    Good for you Jim Riley! While I disagree with you on “Top Two” I applaud you that you backed Demo Rep into a corner and he had to admit that he just stirs the pot!

  14. Demo Rep

    Too many delusional amateurs on this list who love the political cancer systems in the U.S.A. — gerrymanders, Electoral College, party hack primaries, etc. — and love having statutory fixes – IRV, Top 2, NPV, etc.

    The EVIL system is ANTI-Democracy top to bottom.


    P.R. and nonpartisan App.V. — like getting rid of slavery and divine right of kings.

  15. ETJB

    It looks like voters did have some choices, but how much public debate or press coverage existed for the special election?

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