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Polls Shows 61% of Republican Voters Favor National Popular Vote Plan

Published on February 4, 2013, by in General.

According to this article, polling shows that Republican voters now favor the National Popular Vote Plan bill by 61%. Thanks to Rick Hasen for the link.

7 Responses

  1. Demo Rep

    NO uniform definition of Elector in the NPV scheme from political Hell.

    Blatant violation of 14th Amdt, Sec. 1 — having results OUTSIDE of a sovereign State determine the results inside such State.

    Means NOTHING to the MORONS with their love for statutory fixes.

  2. Jim Riley

    You are misinterpreting what the Gallup Poll asked. It did not ask about the NPV Scheme. It made the premise that voters could vote on constitutional amendments.

    It then asked whether the respondents would be in favor of a term limits amendment to the constitution, and whether they would be in favor of changing the constitution to provide for popular election of the president.

  3. Chris

    It would not be a statutory fix, it would require a constitutional amendment.

    Alternately, the people of the states, through their elected state legislators, can decide to sign an interstate compact to give their electoral votes to the winner of a national popular vote.

    Sovereign states already don’t have the unilateral right to determine the president; Texas did not vote for Barack Obama, yet he is the president.

  4. Baronscarpia

    2 –

    Here is what the Gallup poll asked, according to the article…

    “Would you vote for or against a law that would do away with the Electoral College and base the election of the president on the total vote cast throughout the nation?”

    The article further states:

    “Gallup has asked Americans about the Electoral College in a number of ways over the years, and regardless of the precise phrasing, large majorities have always supported doing away with it. That includes 80% support in 1968 and 67% in 1980 with wording similar to what is used today.”

    As Chris states, eliminating the Electoral College entirely would require a constitutional amendment. Implementing NPV would not, however, and in any event the implication of the various polling on the issue of electing the president by national popular vote is quite clear…the majority of Americans support it. Somewhere deep inside your Republican bones you know that Jimbo.

    But wait a minute! Are your Republican brethren jumping ship on this one? Maybe they see the writing on the wall that you don’t. The changing presidential electoral landscape may no longer stack the deck for Republicans under the current EC scheme. This is why we’re getting legislation at the state level to award EC votes by CD.

    So much for the “intent” of our sacred Founding Fathers.

  5. Jim Riley

    #4 Gallup asked, “Suppose that on election day you could vote on key issues as well as candidates.”

    So they were clearly presuming that Article V had been amended to use the popular vote for ratifying amendments.

    Gallup then went on to ask a question about congressional term limits.

    They then asked about “do[ing] away with the Electoral College”

    Did you even read what you quote? Your NPV Scheme does not do away with the Electoral College. It is another stopgap work around, like when Ohio tried to vote on ratifying constitutional amendments, or California tried to imposed congressional term limits.

    In the first election in 1789, presidential electors were elected by district in Virginia and Massachusetts, the two States we commonly think of when we think of our Founding Fathers (Washington, Jefferson, Madison, Monroe, Adams, etc.). Patrick Henry was elected in Virginia’s 10th ED. Artemas Ward ran in Massachusetts, but finished 3rd.

    That is apparently what the Founding Fathers intended to happen.

  6. Baronscarpia

    First – provide some substantiation to the claim that the FFs’ intended that CD’s should be the manner in which states should choose to allocate their CD’s. That’s bullshit.

    But Jimbo, you really are just a fool, aren’t you? I mean that. You are an amazing fool. All these months I’ve given you credit for being an ordinary, run of the mill Republican tool, but I’m forced now to conclude that you are just an extraordinary fool with a special agenda.

    OF COURSE I know that the NPV scheme does not “do away with” the EC. I’ve stated that on many occasions, and even you…a fool…must have noticed that. The Gallup poll does not ask whether respondents are in favor of NPV. You (a fool) and I, both noticed that. BUT…as the article posits, time after time after time polls indicate that the majority of Americans are in favor of electing the president by popular vote. Exactly what about this do you not understand, you insufferable, thick-headed idiot?

    AND…the NPV is not “a stopgap workaround,” you blockhead. It is just another way of allocating the EC votes given to all of the states, just as the Constitution provides in Article III. Read the text. Or have a grad assistant read them to you.

    Jesus, readers…do not send your kids to Regis College. If they’re going to be taught by idiots like this person, they have no chance in the real world after graduation. They’ll be living with you until they die.

  7. Jim Riley

    #6 Virginia and Massachusetts DID choose their presidential electors by district. Was that an accident? Or an intentional action? Read the concerns of George Mason in the Virginia debates on ratification. He assumed as a given that the electors would chosen by district. His concern was that in case no candidate received a vote from the majority of the electors, that the States would vote as a single unit.

    Richard Winger wrote:

    “According to this article, polling shows that Republican voters now favor the National Popular Vote Plan bill by 61%.”

    You admit that the NPV scheme does not do away with the electoral college. Yet the polling question asked if the voters wanted to do away with the electoral college.

    Richard Winger was in error.

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