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U.S. Supreme Court Won’t Review Minnesota Law Banning Wearing Any Political Message at Polls on Election Day

On December 16, the U.S. Supreme Court refused to hear Minnesota Majority v Mansky, 13-185. The case concerned a Minnesota law that says, “A political badge, political button, or other political insignia may not be worn at or about the polling place on primary or election day.” The law is interpreted to cover the area around the polling place, up to 100 feet. The case has been filed in 2010 by individuals who wanted to wear buttons. Some of the plaintiffs were election day monitors who wanted to wear buttons that said, “Please I.D. Me.” Other plaintiffs wanted to wear buttons that said “Tea Party Patriots.”

Here is the 8th circuit opinion
upholding the law, which was 2-1 and which had been issued on March 6, 2013. That decision conflicts with a U.S. District Court decision from Arizona in 2010, which said that voters were free to wear a tea shirt that said, “Flagstaff Tea Party.” Thanks to several readers for the news.

3 Responses

  1. Demo Rep

    How about –

    Save Democracy
    P.R. and
    nonpartisan App.V.

    – on T-shirts

  2. Richard Winger

    Highly political! Can’t have such a message where voters might be upset by that message.

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