June 1, 2008 Ė Volume 24, Number 2

This issue was originally printed on ivory paper.

Table of Contents

  1. TWO-FRONT FIGHT FOR BETTER OHIO BALLOT ACCESS
  2. NORTH CAROLINA LOSS
  3. MISSISSIPPI DEMOCRATS LOSE
  4. LEGISLATIVE NEWS
  5. LAWSUIT NEWS
  6. TENNESSEE REVISES INDEPENDENT PRESIDENTIAL RULES
  7. NORTHERN MARIANA ISLANDS GETS A DELEGATE
  8. LIBERTARIAN PARTY CONVENTION
  9. LIBERTARIAN PRESIDENTIAL CONVENTION VOTE
  10. 2008 PETITIONING FOR PRESIDENT
  11. PARTY FOR SOCIALISM & LIBERATION
  12. MINNESOTA US SENATE RACE
  13. WORKING FAMILIES PARTY
  14. SPECIAL CONGRESSIONAL ELECTIONS
  15. POLLINA REMAINS IN GUB. RACE
  16. SUBSCRIBING TO BAN WITH PAYPAL


TWO-FRONT FIGHT FOR BETTER OHIO BALLOT ACCESS

ACTION IN LEGISLATURE AND FEDERAL COURT

The Ohio Libertarian Party is launching a two-front war to improve ballot access for minor parties. Between June 3 and June 6, a lawsuit will be filed in federal court, to be called Libertarian Party of Ohio v Brunner. Also, the party has found three friendly state legislators who have arranged for the Legislative Counsel to draft a bill, easing the stateís law. They are Representatives Jon Peterson (R), Thomas Brinkman (R), and Dan Stewart (D).

The lawsuit will build on the partyís winning 2006 lawsuit, which struck down the existing law. The existing law requires a petition of 1% of the last vote cast, due almost a year before the election. That amounts to 40,228 signatures. The lawsuit will allege that since the old law is void, and no new law has been passed to replace it, and since the Ohio Libertarian Party has shown a modicum of support, therefore it should be placed on the ballot this year.

The party already submitted 6,500 signatures on a party petition the day before the March 2008 primary, along with declarations of candidacy for its nominees for Congress and state legislature and presidential elector. No other group even tried to qualify as a party.

The Secretary of State refused the partyís request. She had promulgated an emergency rule that said a party needs 20,114 signatures by late November 2007. But the partyís attorneys have found a 1930 Ohio Attorney that says state executive officials are not permitted to "make up" election restrictions. Furthermore, the 6th circuit ruled in 1984 that when a stateís ballot access law is unconstitutional, and the legislature has not rewritten it, states must permit any candidate or any group with a modicum of support to get on the ballot. Ohio is in the 6th Circuit.

The proposed bill has already been drafted by Legislative Counsel. It reduces the party petition to one-fourth of 1% of the last gubernatorial election year vote (10,057 signatures). It deletes wording on the party petition that implies that the signers are party members. It eases the deadline from 120 days before the primary, to 75 days. And it eases the vote test for a party to remain on, from 5% for president or Governor, to 1% at either of the last two elections for any statewide office.

Interplay Between Lawsuit and Bill

If the lawsuit wins, it is virtually certain that the proposed bill, or some other good bill, will pass. That is because if the lawsuit wins, the state wonít be able to keep any group off the ballot as a party if it can show a modicum of support. Under the U.S. Supreme Court precedent McCarthy v Briscoe, that can include evidence from outside that particular state.

So far this year, not a single bill has passed in any state that eases ballot access for minor parties or independent candidates. The Coalition for Free & Open Elections (COFOE) and Ballot Access News were both founded in 1985. Starting in 1985, every year has always seen at least one ballot access improvement passed into law in at least one state. Perhaps this good tradition can keep going, thanks to Ohio. Here is a list of at least one state in which some improvement was made by a legislature: 1985 Idaho, 1986 Georgia, 1987 Nevada, 1988 Michigan, 1989 Oregon, 1990 Florida, 1991 Wyoming, 1992 New York, 1993 Missouri, 1994 Connecticut, 1995 Colorado, 1996 New Hampshire, 1997 Alaska, 1998 Colorado, 1999 Hawaii, 2000 Arizona, 2001 Virginia, 2002 Michigan, 2003 Virginia, 2004 Louisiana, 2005 North Dakota, 2006 North Carolina, 2007 Colorado.


NORTH CAROLINA LOSS

On May 27, Judge Robert Hobgood signed a 17-page opinion, upholding North Carolinaís ballot access laws for minor parties. That law requires a petition signed by 2% of the last gubernatorial vote, 69,734 signatures. North Carolina requires more signatures than any other state for this purpose, except for California.

Judge Hobgood did not write the opinion. The attorneys for both sides had written sample opinions, and the Judge chose the stateís version. The case is Libertarian Party of N.C. v State Board of Elections, Wake Superior Court, 05-cvs-13073. The decision did not even mention many of the issues in the case, such as whether there is any state interest in forcing members of parties that go off the ballot to become independent voters. Nor did the decision mention much of the evidence. The Libertarian and Green Parties will appeal.

No state court, except for the highest state court in that state, has ever struck down the number of signatures needed for a new or minor party, or for an independent candidate. The only time such cases have won was after that case got to the highest state court. The winning instances are New York in 1912, Michigan in 1982, Alaska in 1982, and Maryland in 2003.


MISSISSIPPI DEMOCRATS LOSE

On May 28, the 5th circuit reversed the U.S. District Court in the Mississippi Democratic Partyís lawsuit to exclude non-members from its primary. Mississippi State Democratic Party v Barbour, 07-60667. The Court said the party should have revised its Bylaws to implement how it would close its primaries, before filing the lawsuit.


LEGISLATIVE NEWS

National Popular Vote Bills: the Hawaii bill, SB 2898, became law on May 1, when the legislature overrode Governor Linda Lingleís veto. The Vermont bill, SB 270, failed to become law because Governor Jim Douglas vetoed it on May 16. The Rhode Island Senate passed S2112 on May 27 by a vote of 27-10.

Ballot Access Bills: both the helpful Missouri bill, and the harmful bill, failed to pass before the legislature adjourned. SB 797 would have passed if only the legislature were not required to adjourn promptly at 6 p.m. on the last day. The bill was being considered for final passage when the clock tolled. The bill would have let a petition for a new party circulate before the group had chosen its presidential candidate.

Missouri HB 1310, which would have moved the independent deadline from July to March, failed.

Some Missouri bills that would have made it more difficult to qualify an initiative also failed to pass.

The Illinois bill which would have made it more difficult for a ballot-qualified party to nominate by party meeting, HB 5263, failed to pass. The Alabama bill which would have eased ballot access, HB 738, failed to reach the House floor before the legislature adjourned.

Presidential Primary Bill: the Kansas bill to provide for a presidential primary in 2012, HB 2019, was vetoed by Governor Kathleen Sebelius. Kansas is one of 10 states with no presidential primary this year. The bill would have set a date so early (the first Saturday in February) that it would have violated national party rules. The first Saturday in February in 2012 is February 2, and the first "legal" date in 2012 (except for 4 states that get favorable treatment) is February 5.

Instant-Runoff Voting Bill: Colorado HB 1378 is on the Governorís desk. He has until June 21 to either sign or veto it. It would let any city, or any special district, use IRV to elect its own officers.


LAWSUIT NEWS

Alabama: on May 27, the U.S. Supreme Court issued its opinion in Riley v Kennedy, 07-77, interpreting Sec. Five of the federal Voting Rights Act. The Court said that the Governor of Alabama has a right to appoint a county commissioner in cases of vacancy, since the Alabama Constitution provides for that. The lower court had said there should be a special election. The decision is highly technical and has no broader implications. The controversy was how to interpret the Act when there have been multiple changes to a state law, back and forth, since the Voting Rights Act was enacted in 1965.

Florida: on May 28, a U.S. District Court in the Middle District (Tampa) again ruled that if the Democratic National Committee wants to deprive Florida of any delegates to the national convention, it may do so. DiMaio v Democratic National Committee, 8:08-cv-672. The same plaintiffís first case had been dismissed on standing grounds; this was his second attempt.

U.S. Senator Bill Nelson had lost a similar lawsuit in the Northern District late last year. A similar lawsuit is pending in the Southern District (Miami). It is Geller v Dem. Nat. Comm., 08-cv-60774, and was filed on May 22.

Hawaii: on May 1, U.S. District Court judge Alan Kay, a Reagan appointee, upheld the stateís petition checking procedures. Nader v Cronin, 04-611. The same judge had earlier upheld the other point in the same lawsuit, whether it is constitutional for a state to require six times as many signatures for an independent presidential candidate as for a new party. It is not known if Nader will appeal. He is already safely on the ballot in Hawaii for 2008.

Michigan: the State Court of Appeals will hear Ebbers v Secretary of State, no. 283782, on June 11. It challenges a law that requires circulators of a recall petition to live in the district of the office-holder who is being recalled. The lower court had upheld the law.

Oklahoma: the 10th circuit will hear Yes on Term Limits v Savage during the week of September 22-28. This is the case challenging Oklahomaís ban on out-of-state initiative circulators. The lower court had upheld the law.

Federal: on May 27, U.S. District Judge Ricardo Urbina, a Clinton appointee in Washington, D.C., ruled against most of Ralph Naderís damages lawsuit against the Democratic Party and its allies, for their efforts to forcibly prevent some voters from voting for Nader in 2004. Still pending are Naderís points concerning section 1983, the civil rights claims. Nader v Democratic Nat. Comm., 07-2136.


TENNESSEE REVISES INDEPENDENT PRESIDENTIAL RULES

The Tennessee Elections Coordinator, Brook Thompson, recently revised the procedures for independent presidential candidate petitions. The law says any independent candidate (for any office) needs 25 signatures. The new regulation says that an independent presidential candidate needs 275 signatures on a petition that must list eleven candidates for presidential elector.

The old procedure had required 25 voters to each sign eleven petitions, one for each elector. Although the old procedure seems easier in one sense, the paperwork will be simpler with just a single petition that must only be signed once by each voter.


NORTHERN MARIANA ISLANDS GETS A DELEGATE

On May 8, President Bush signed S. 2739 into law. It provides that the Northern Mariana Islands may elect a Delegate to the U.S. House. The Northern Mariana Islands had already been electing one, but he had no authority and had received no federal salary. A strong independent candidate has announced. He is Gregorio Sablan, now the Executive Director of the NMI Elections Commission.


LIBERTARIAN PARTY CONVENTION

On May 25, the Libertarian Party national convention chose former Georgia Congressman Bob Barr for president. Barr served in Congress for 8 years, longer than either Hillary Clinton or Barack Obama has served so far.

For those who are nostalgic for old-fashioned U.S. presidential conventions, the Libertarian event was a treat. Six ballots were held to determine a presidential nominee. No major party has had to hold six ballots to determine a presidential nominee since 1940, when the Republican convention also took six ballots to nominate Wendell Willkie. Barr and Mary Ruwart were separated by only one vote on the first ballot, and were tied on the third and fourth ballots. Barr actually lost votes between the second and third ballots, whereas Ruwart gained on every ballot.

The vote for each candidate who was nominated is shown below. The "Other" vote, not shown on the charts, included thirteen for the First Ballot, six on the Second, one on the Third, six on the Fifth, and 26 on the Sixth.

The rules were that after each ballot, any candidate who polled less than 5% was eliminated. Furthermore, whoever placed last was also eliminated. The turning point in the presidential selection was after the Fifth ballot, when Wayne Allyn Root, who had just been eliminated, took the podium and asked his supporters to help him be the vice-presidential candidate with Barr. This was an obvious but indirect appeal to his supporters to vote for Barr for president on the Sixth ballot.

The vice-president balloting took two ballots. The First Ballot: Root 276, Steve Kubby 209, Dan Williams 40, Jim Burns 20, Gail Lightfoot 14, Leonard Schwartz (who had withdrawn) 1. The Second Ballot: Root 289, Kubby 255, Williams 14, None of the Above 6.


LIBERTARIAN PRESIDENTIAL CONVENTION VOTE

"Ruw" is Mary Ruwart; "Grav" is Mike Gravel; "Phil" is George Phillies; "Kub" is Steve Kubby; "Jing" is Mike Jingozian.
See page six for "other" vote.

`
1st BALLOT
2nd BALLOT

STATE

BARR

RUW

ROOT

GRAV

PHIL

KUB

JING

SMITH

BARR

RUW

ROOT

GRAV

PHIL

KUB

Ala

7

2

0

1

0

1

0

0

7

2

0

1

0

1

Alas

1

1

2

0

0

1

0

0

1

1

2

0

0

0

Ariz

2

8

1

2

1

3

0

0

2

8

1

2

0

4

Ark

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

Cal

17

20

38

9

10

6

0

0

21

20

41

9

5

3

Colo

2

4

9

2

2

2

2

1

2

6

11

2

2

4

Ct

0

1

0

2

0

2

0

0

1

1

1

2

0

0

Del

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

DC

3

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

3

0

0

0

0

0

Fla

9

5

1

2

2

0

0

0

12

4

1

1

1

0

Ga

33

2

0

0

0

0

0

0

33

2

0

0

0

0

Hi

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

Id

1

1

1

1

0

2

1

0

1

0

3

1

0

2

Ill

3

10

1

1

1

2

2

0

3

10

5

1

1

2

Ind

4

2

6

5

3

0

2

0

6

2

6

7

2

0

Iowa

0

1

2

1

3

0

0

0

0

1

2

1

3

0

Kan

4

2

3

0

0

0

1

0

4

2

4

0

0

0

Ky

0

1

3

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

3

0

0

0

La

2

1

3

1

0

0

0

1

2

1

2

3

0

0

Me

1

1

0

0

0

1

0

0

1

2

0

0

1

0

Md

2

2

0

0

5

1

0

0

2

4

0

2

2

0

Mass

0

0

0

0

6

0

4

0

0

0

0

0

6

0

Mich

4

12

5

3

0

1

1

0

5

13

6

2

0

0

Minn

2

1

2

0

1

0

0

1

2

2

1

1

1

0

Miss

1

2

1

0

0

0

0

0

1

3

0

0

0

0

Mo

5

4

4

1

0

3

2

0

8

3

6

1

0

1

Mt

0

1

0

0

2

1

0

0

0

1

0

0

1

2

Neb

0

3

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

2

0

0

0

0

Nev

0

1

0

6

0

1

0

1

0

2

0

6

0

1

NH

1

3

0

1

3

0

0

0

1

3

1

1

3

0

NJ

0

3

11

0

0

0

0

0

0

3

11

0

0

0

NM

0

3

1

1

0

2

0

1

0

3

3

1

1

1

NY

4

5

6

4

0

1

1

0

4

6

5

4

0

2

NoC

2

5

0

1

0

0

0

0

2

5

0

1

0

0

Ohio

0

3

7

0

0

0

0

0

0

3

7

0

0

0

Ok

3

1

0

0

0

3

0

0

3

1

2

1

0

0

Ore

1

1

1

3

0

0

9

1

6

2

1

5

1

0

Pa

6

2

0

7

0

1

1

0

10

3

0

7

1

5

RI

0

0

0

0

2

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

2

0

SoC

8

0

1

3

0

0

0

0

8

0

1

3

0

0

SoD

0

0

3

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

3

0

0

0

Tn

3

8

1

0

1

1

0

0

3

9

1

0

0

0

Tex

8

14

6

4

1

2

0

0

13

14

5

2

0

1

Ut

2

2

0

1

0

1

0

0

3

2

0

0

0

1

Vt

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

Va

10

3

1

1

0

0

1

0

10

3

1

2

0

0

Wa

1

3

3

4

2

1

0

0

4

4

1

3

2

0

WV

0

2

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

2

0

0

0

1

Wi

0

4

0

2

0

0

0

0

1

5

0

0

0

0

Wy

1

1

0

1

0

0

0

0

2

0

0

1

0

0

TOT

153

152

123

71

49

41

23

6

188

162

138

73

36

32

 

`
3rd BALLOT
4th BALLOT
5th BALLOT
6th BALLOT

STATE

BARR

RUW

ROOT

GRAV

PHIL

BARR

RUW

ROOT

GRAV

BARR

RUW

ROOT

BARR

RUW

Ala

7

3

0

1

0

7

3

0

1

7

3

0

7

4

Alas

1

1

2

0

0

1

1

2

0

1

1

2

3

1

Ariz

3

12

0

2

0

3

12

1

1

4

12

1

5

12

Ark

0

1

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

1

0

0

1

Cal

21

22

41

8

4

21

29

42

5

23

31

41

58

37

Colo

3

6

15

2

1

4

7

14

2

3

7

17

3

18

Ct

1

1

1

2

0

0

0

0

5

0

0

5

1

1

Del

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

1

1

0

DC

3

0

0

0

0

3

0

0

0

3

0

0

3

0

Fla

11

4

1

1

1

10

8

0

1

11

7

1

11

8

Ga

33

2

0

0

0

33

2

0

0

33

2

0

33

2

Hi

0

1

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

1

0

0

1

Id

1

2

3

1

0

1

2

3

1

2

1

3

2

3

Ill

5

12

2

1

1

5

12

3

2

6

12

4

9

13

Ind

5

2

6

7

2

6

2

6

8

6

6

9

10

12

Iowa

0

1

2

1

3

2

1

2

2

4

1

2

5

2

Kan

4

2

4

0

0

5

2

3

0

5

2

3

7

3

Ky

0

1

3

0

0

0

1

3

0

0

1

3

3

1

La

2

1

3

3

0

2

1

3

3

2

1

4

5

1

Me

1

2

1

0

0

1

2

1

0

1

2

1

2

2

Md

2

5

0

3

0

2

4

0

4

4

5

1

5

5

Mass

0

0

0

0

6

0

4

1

0

0

4

1

0

6

Mich

4

13

6

2

0

5

12

6

2

5

14

6

8

16

Minn

2

2

2

0

1

3

2

1

1

5

2

0

4

3

Miss

1

3

0

0

0

2

2

0

0

2

2

0

2

2

Mo

7

4

7

1

0

9

5

4

1

10

3

6

14

5

Mt

0

2

1

0

1

0

2

2

0

0

3

1

1

3

Neb

1

2

0

0

0

1

2

0

0

0

2

0

0

2

Nev

0

3

0

6

0

0

3

0

6

0

9

0

0

9

NH

2

2

0

2

3

2

3

2

2

2

5

2

3

5

NJ

0

3

11

0

0

0

3

11

0

0

3

11

11

3

NM

0

4

3

1

1

0

3

4

1

1

3

5

3

3

NY

4

7

5

5

0

4

8

6

3

5

8

7

11

9

NoC

2

5

0

1

0

2

5

0

1

2

6

0

2

6

Ohio

0

3

7

0

0

0

3

7

0

0

3

7

5

4

Ok

4

1

2

0

0

4

1

2

0

6

1

0

6

1

Ore

5

2

1

5

2

6

2

1

7

7

8

1

7

8

Pa

10

5

2

8

1

12

5

3

6

12

6

4

15

8

RI

0

0

0

0

2

2

0

0

0

2

0

0

2

0

SoC

8

0

1

4

0

9

0

1

3

11

0

2

12

0

SoD

0

0

3

0

0

0

0

3

0

0

0

3

3

0

Tn

2

10

2

0

0

3

10

1

0

3

10

1

4

10

Tex

10

16

6

4

0

11

16

6

3

14

17

5

14

22

Ut

4

3

0

0

0

3

3

1

0

3

3

1

4

3

Vt

0

1

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

1

0

0

1

Va

10

3

1

2

0

11

3

1

1

11

3

2

12

3

Wa

4

4

1

3

2

4

6

1

3

4

9

1

5

9

WV

0

2

0

1

0

0

2

0

1

0

3

0

0

3

Wi

1

5

0

0

0

1

5

0

0

1

5

0

1

5

Wy

2

0

0

1

0

2

0

1

0

2

0

1

2

0

TOT

186

186

146

78

31

202

202

149

76

223

229

165

324

276


2008 PETITIONING FOR PRESIDENT

STATE
REQUIREMENTS
SIGNATURES COLLECTED
DEADLINES
FULL PARTY
CAND
LIB'T
GREEN
CONSTI
NADER
Party
Indp.

Alabama

37,513

5,000

0

0

0

0

June 3

Sep. 8

Alaska

(reg) 7,124

#3,128

already on

*3,050

already on

0

Aug. 6

Aug. 6

Ariz.

20,449

#21,759

already on

already on

0

*30,000

Mar. 6

June 4

Arkansas

10,000

#1,000

already on

already on

already on

0

June 30

Aug. 4

Calif.

(reg) 88,991

158,372

already on

already on

already on

*seek nom

Dec. 31, 07

Aug. 8

Colorado

(reg) 1,000

pay $500

already on

already on

already on

0

June 1

June 17

Conn.

no procedure

#7,500

100

*2,000

*150

0

- - -

Aug. 6

Delaware

(reg) *284

*5,674

already on

already on

already on

*seek nom

Aug. 12

July 15

D.C.

no procedure

est. #3,900

canít start

already on

canít start

canít start

- - -

Aug. 19

Florida

be organized

104,334

already on

already on

already on

*seek nom

Sep. 2

July 15

Georgia

44,089

#42,489

already on

3,000

0

0

July 8

July 8

Hawaii

663

4,291

already on

already on

already on

already on

Apr. 3

Sep. 5

Idaho

11,968

5,984

already on

0

already on

0

Aug. 29

Aug. 25

Illinois

no procedure

#25,000

*25,000

already on

500

*25,000

- - -

June 23

Indiana

no procedure

#32,742

already on

0

0

0

- - -

June 30

Iowa

no procedure

#1,500

0

0

*100

0

- - -

Aug. 15

Kansas

16,994

5,000

already on

0

0

0

June 2

Aug. 4

Kentucky

no procedure

#5,000

0

0

*500

0

- - -

Sep. 2

La.

(reg) 1,000

pay $500

already on

already on

47

0

May 22

Sep. 2

Maine

27,544

#4,000

0

already on

0

0

Dec 14, 07

Ag 15

Maryland

10,000

est. 32,500

already on

already on

0

0

Aug. 4

Aug. 4

Mass.

est. (reg) 40,500

#10,000

*5,000

already on

0

0

Feb. 1

July 29

Michigan

38,024

38,024

already on

already on

already on

*seek nom

July 17

July 17

Minnesota

110,150

#2,000

0

0

0

0

July 15

Sep. 9

Mississippi

be organized

1,000

already on

already on

already on

0

Jan. 10

Sep. 5

Missouri

10,000

10,000

already on

0

finished

0

July 28

July 28

Montana

5,000

#5,000

already on

*0

already on

0

Mar. 13

July 30

Nebraska

5,921

2,500

finished

already on

already on

0

Aug. 1

Aug. 26

Nevada

5,746

5,746

already on

already on

already on

0

July 3

July 3

N. Hamp.

12,524

#3,000

*finished

0

0

0

Aug. 6

Aug. 6

New Jersey

no procedure

#800

*50

0

*300

0

- - -

July 28

New Mex.

2,794

16,764

already on

already on

*already on

already on

Apr. 1

June 4

New York

no procedure

#15,000

can't start

can't start

can't start

*seek nom

- - -

Aug. 19

No. Car.

69,734

69,734

*already on

in court

0

0

May 16

June 12

No. Dakota

7,000

#4,000

already on

0

already on

0

Apr. 11

Sep. 5

Ohio

20,114

5,000

disputed

*400

finished

0

Aug 21

Aug. 21

Oklahoma

46,324

43,913

0

0

0

0

May 1

July 15

Oregon

20,640

18,356

already on

already on

already on

*seek nom

Aug. 26

Aug. 26

Penn.

no procedure

#24,666

*20,000

*3,000

*350

*2,000

- - -

Aug. 1

Rhode Isl.

18,557

#1,000

0

0

0

0

May 30

Sep. 5

So. Caro.

10,000

10,000

already on

already on

already on

*seek nom

May 4

July 15

So. Dakota

8,389

3,356

*0

0

already on

0

Mar. 25

Aug. 5

Tennessee

45,254

*275

in court

in court

in court

0

unsettled

Aug. 21

Texas

43,991

74,108

already on

*too late

*too late

*too late

May 26

May 12

Utah

2,000

#1,000

already on

0

already on

0

Feb. 15

Sep. 2

Vermont

be organized

#1,000

already on

0

already on

0

Jan. 1

Sep. 12

Virginia

no procedure

#10,000

*10,000

*5,200

0

*500

- - -

Aug. 22

Wash.

no procedure

#1,000

canít start

canít start

canít start

canít start

- - -

July 26

West Va.

no procedure

#15,118

0

already on

*11,500

0

- - -

Aug. 1

Wisconsin

10,000

#2,000

already on

already on

0

0

June 2

Sep. 2

Wyoming

3,868

3,868

already on

0

*0

*3,000

June 2

Aug. 25

TOTAL STATES ON
*29
22
*20
2
~ ~

#partisan label is OK (other than "independent").
*entry changed since May 1, 2008 B.A.N.
"Nader" column refers mostly to independent petitions.
"Seek nom" means Nader is seeking the nomination of a ballot-qualified party in that state.


PARTY FOR SOCIALISM & LIBERATION

The Party for Socialism and Liberation isnít on the petitioning chart above, due to space problems. It is now on for president in Florida and Arkansas, and is finished in Vermont, and has 1,000 signatures in Iowa, 900 in New Jersey, and 700 in Mississippi.


MINNESOTA US SENATE RACE

Jesse Ventura says he will decide by July whether to enter the Independence Party of Minnesota primary, as a candidate for U.S. Senate. If he doesnít run, Dean Barkley will.


WORKING FAMILIES PARTY

The South Carolina Working Families Party, which has been ballot-qualified since 2006, held a convention on May 10. It nominated a U.S. Senate candidate, Michael Cone. He is also seeking the Democratic nomination at the June primary. The South Carolina Working Families Party is the third state unit of that party to have run statewide candidates. The others are New York and Massachusetts.


SPECIAL CONGRESSIONAL ELECTIONS

Louisiana, First District, May 3: Steve Scalise., Rep., 75.1%; Gilda Reed, Dem., 22.5%; Skip Galan, indp., 1.7%; Anthony Gentile, Independent American Party, .6%. In November 2006, the vote had been: Rep. 88.1%; Dem. 10.8%; Libertarian 1.1%.

Louisiana, Sixth District, May 3: Don Cazayoux, Dem., 49.2%; Woody Jenkins, Rep., 46.3%; Ashley Casey, indp., 3.7%; Peter Aranyosi, indp., .4%; Randall Hayes, Constitution, .4%. In November 2006, the vote had been: Rep. 82.8%; Libertarian 17.2%.

Mississippi: First District, May 13: Travis Childers, Dem., 53.8%; Greg Davis, Rep., 46.2%. In November 2006, the vote had been: Rep. 65.9%; Dem. 34.1%.


POLLINA REMAINS IN GUB. RACE

Anthony Pollina, state chair of the Vermont Progressive Party, announced on May 29 that he is still running for Governor. There had been speculation that he might drop out, because the Democrats recently recruited a gubernatorial candidate, Gaye Symington, the Speaker of the Vermont House.


SUBSCRIBING TO BAN WITH PAYPAL

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